Volume 20(1): September, 2014

STRENGTH TRAINING 7

This first issue of Volume 17 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with strength and resistance training and stretching. The first issue of strength training can be accessed as Volume 2(1), the second as Volume 5(1), the third as Volume 8(1), the fourth as Volume 11(1), the fifth as Volume 14(1), and the sixth as Volume 17(1). These latest researches indicate that many of today's strength training practices are incorrect and the benefits from such training is greatly exaggerated.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

    GENERAL THEORY

  1. EFFECTIVE RESISTANCE TRAINING DOES NOT REQUIRE "GOING TO FAILURE"

    Sundstrup, E., Jakobsen, M. D., Andersen, C. H., Zebisz, M. K., & Andersen, L. L. (2011). Muscle activation strategies during strength training with heavy loading versus repetitions to failure. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2298.

  2. ONE SET OF RESISTANCE EXERCISES PRODUCES MAXIMAL FATIGUE

    Jakobsen, M. D., Sundstrup, E., Andersen, C. H., Zebis, M. K., & Andersen, L. L. (2011). Evaluation of neuromuscular fatigue indices during a full bout of resistance training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2300.

  3. HIP AND KNEE KINEMATICS DIFFER BETWEEN THE GENDERS

    Ford, K. R., Myer, G. D., & Hewett, T. E. (2010). Longitudinal effects of maturation on lower extremity joint stiffness in young athletes. Presentation number 888 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  4. RECOVERY FROM RESISTANCE EXERCISE IS GENDER SPECIFIC

    Bottaro, M., Brown, L. E., Gentil, P., Pinto, R. S., Martorelli, S., Jesus, D., & Flores, D. (2011). Dissociated time course of recovery between genders following resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 1707.

  5. MAXIMAL AND EXPLOSIVE STRENGTH TRAINING HAVE DIFFERENT AND SPECIFIC ADAPTATION EFFECTS

    Tillin, N. A., Pain, M. T., & Folland, J. P. (2012). Training for maximal vs. explosive strength elicits distinct neuromuscular adaptations. Presentation number 596 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  6. SPEED OF MUSCLE ACTIVATION A POSSIBLE PERFORMANCE DISCRIMINATOR IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    Thompson, B. J., Ryan, E. D., Sobolewski, E. J., Smith, D. B. Conchola, E. C., Akehi, K., Buckminster, T., & Cramer, J. T. (2012). Isometric rapid torque characteristics as predictors of playing status in division i collegiate football players. Presentation number 1863 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  7. REPEATED BOUT EFFECT OCCURS AFTER DIFFERENT RESISTANCE EXERCISES

    Jo, E., Zourdos, M. C., Wilson, J. M., Nosaka, K. K., Lee, S.-R., Naimo, M., Henning, P. C., Park, Y.-M., Khamoui, A. V., Park, B.-S., Panton, L. B., & Kim, J.-S. (2012). Varying muscle-specific exercise between consecutive training sessions does not diminish the repeated bout effect. Presentation number 1876 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  8. EXPLOSIVE RESISTANCE EXERCISES PROVIDE MORE NEURAL STIMULATION TO THE MUSCLE GROUPS THAN CONVENTIONAL EXERCISES

    Folland, J. P., & Fry, A. (2012). Neural drive during explosive force production exceeds that at maximum force. Presentation number 2179 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

    STRENGTH TRAINING FACTORS

  9. IN UNTRAINED MALES, TRAINING EFFECTS ARE DERIVED FROM LARGELY NON-SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

    Hager, R. L., Stites, A. W., Parcell, A. C., & Hunter, I. (2011). Comparison of the effects of high-resistance cycle training and leg press on Wingate anaerobic test, strength, and time-trial performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2828.

  10. LOW RATHER THAN HEAVY WEIGHTS INFLUENCE ENDURANCE DEVELOPMENT

    Mathis, S. L., Kim, Y., & Kang, M. (2011). Effect of strength training on cycling endurance performance: A meta-analysis. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2946.

  11. CARBOHYDRATE AND CARBOHYDRATE AND PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATIONS IMPROVE RESISTANCE EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Welikonich, M. J., Nagle, E. F., Goss, F. L., Robertson, R. J., & Crawford, K. (2011). Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplementation on resistance exercise performance, perceived exertion, and salivary cortisol. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2216.

  12. UNILATERAL WEIGHT WORKOUTS ELICIT GREATER ENERGY EXPENDITURE THAN BILATERAL WORKOUTS

    Nakachi, E. H., Feland, J. B., & Eggett, D. (2012). Greater energy expenditure in unilateral vs. bilateral weight training. Presentation number 595 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  13. POST-ACTIVATION POTENTIATION DOES NOT AFFECT POWER OR SPEED

    Naclerio, F., Faigenbaum, A., Larumbe, E., Friedman, P. E., & Ratamess, N. (2012). Effects of eight post-activation potentiation protocols on jump and sprint performance in college athletes. Presentation number 599 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  14. LIMB AND GENDER DIFFERENCES EXIST AFTER FATIGUING RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Senefeld, J., Yoon, T., Bement, M. H., & Hunter, S. K. (2014). Sex differences in fatigue during dynamic contractions differ between arm and leg muscles. Presentation number 1014 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  15. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING MAY ALTER SUBSEQUENT RESISTANCE TRAINING RESPONSES

    Apró, W., Borgenvik, M., Ekblom, B., & Blomstrand, E. (2012). Endurance exercise attenuates mTOR signaling following resistance exercise. Presentation number 1144 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  16. FEMALES RECOVER FROM RESISTANCE TRAINING WITHIN 24 HOURS

    Campbell, J. A., & Bishop, P. A. (2012). Recovery and soreness in trained females after an exhaustive resistance training protocol. Presentation number 1345 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  17. DECREASING-RESISTANCE PROTOCOL PRODUCES GREATER TRAINING VOLUME IN WOMEN

    Kwon, Y. S., & Schneider, S. M. (2012). Optimizing resistance during multiple-set weight training to increase training volume in women. Presentation number 1869 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  18. PERFORMANCE SUPPLEMENT HAS ONLY MINOR EFFECTS IN RESISTANCE-TRAINED MALES

    Ormsbee, M. J., Mandler, W. K., Thomas, D. D., Kinsey, A. W., Riley, C. J., Panton, L. B., & Kim, J.-S. (2012). Effects of performance supplements on body composition and strength in trained men during 6 weeks of resistance training. Presentation number 1827 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  19. BILATERAL SQUATTING IS MORE EFFECTIVE THAN UNILATERAL SQUATTING

    McCurdy, K., Langford, G., Doscher, M., & Walker, J. (2012). Comparison of unilateral versus bilateral resistance training on absolute and relative strength. Presentation number 1858 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  20. AEROBIC EXERCISE DAMPENS SUBSEQUENT RESISTANCE EXERCISE CAPABILITY

    Tan, J. G., Coburn, J. W., Judelson, D. A., Brown, L. E., Barsaga, B., Morales, J. R., Du Bois, A. M., Nelson, G. C., Cazas, V. L., & Truong, L. (2012). Acute effects of lower body aerobic exercise on lower and upper body resistance exercise workouts. Presentation number 1871 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  21. TECHNIQUES CHANGE WITH FATIGUING RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Hooper, D. R., Szivak, T. K., Comstock, B. A., Dunn-Lewis, C., Apicella, J. M., Kelly, N. A., Creighton, B. C., DiStefano, L. J., Volek, J., Maresh, C. M., & Kraemer, W. J. (2012). Changes in movement patterns following a fatiguing resistance training protocol. Presentation number 2190 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  22. CARBOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION DOES NOT ALTER THE RESISTANCE TRAINING RESPONSE IN FEMALES

    Campbell, B. I., Raposo, K. A., Bullion, A., Petchonka, A., Pannoni, N., Cloer, B., Deignan, S., Vyas, T., & Kreider, R. (2012). Pre-exercise carbohydrate supplementation does not suppress rate of fatigue during resistance exercise in trained females. Presentation number 2353 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  23. CORE ENDURANCE-TRAINING HINDERS RUNNING ECONOMY

    Figg, K., Kirk, C., Wittman, K., Appel, K., Handorff, A., Van Guilder, G., & Janot, J. (2012). Effects of short-term core endurance training on running economy. Presentation number 2620 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  24. AFTER INJURY, THERE IS NO SECONDARY STRENGTH LOSS

    Warren, G. L., Farthing, A. K., Piaro, B. B., Coley, S. R., Satterfied, C. W., Vlahos, C. D., & Lewis, J. E. (2012). Does a secondary loss of strength occur following induction of muscle injury? Presentation number 2937 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  25. THREE RESISTANCE EXERCISES USE THE SAME MUSCLE GROUPS

    Morton, A., Townsend, J., Moore, H., & Cosio-Lima, L. (2012). A comparison of EMG activity between dumbbell bench, barbell bench, and vertical chest press Presentation number 3275 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

    APPLICATIONS

  26. CORE STRENGTH TRAINING IMPROVES MALE MIDDLE-DISTANCE RUNNING PERFORMANCES

    Childs, D., Ryan, M., & Reneau, P. (2011). The effects of core strength training on maximal running performance in middle-distance running. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2764.

  27. PILATES IS ONE OPTION FOR NON-SPECIFIC TRAINING IN BASEBALL PITCHERS

    English, T., & Howe, K. (2007). The effect of Pilates exercise on trunk and postural stability and throwing velocity in college baseball pitchers: single-subject design. North American Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 2(1), 8-21.

  28. CORE STRENGTH TRAINING NOT AS EFFECTIVE IN TRAINED ATHLETES

    Kramer, K. E., Kelly, S. K., Manos, T. M., & Ortega, J. D. (2012). The effects of core strength training on static and dynamic balance in female collegiate athletes. Presentation number 1454 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  29. CO-CONTRACTION MUSCLE EXERCISES COULD BE BETTER THAN WEIGHT-ROOM EXERCISING

    Maeo, S., Yoshitake, Y., Takai, Y., Fukunaga, T., & Kanehisa, H. (2012). Effects of resistance training with maximal voluntary co-contraction on neuromuscular function. Presentation number 1873 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  30. LAND-TRAINING DOES NOT HALT LOSS OF SWIMMING STRENGTH IN A "HARD TRAINING" PROGRAM

    Havriluk, R, (2013). Seasonal variations in swimming force and training adaptation. Journal of Swimming Research, 21, pp. 8.

  31. KINESIOTAPING ASSISTS IN RECOVERY AFTER MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Lee, K-W., Im, S-H., Kim, J., & Lee, J. (2012). Effect of kinesiotaping on muscle damage parameters following eccentric muscle contractions. Presentation number 2939 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  32. RATE OF FORCE DEVELOPMENT IS HARD TO IMPROVE THROUGH STRENGTH TRAINING

    Blazevich, A. (2012). Are training velocity and movement pattern important determinants of muscular rate of force development enhancement? European Journal of Applied Physiology, DOI 10.1007/s00421-012-2352-6 (2 pp.).

  33. POST-ACTIVATION POTENTIATION IMPROVES SPRINT PERFORMANCE

    Conley, D. S., Bright, A. M., Kellerman, T. R., Pollard, P. K., Reikofski, K. A., & Evetovich, T. K. (2012). Post-activation potentiation improves sprint performance in collegiate football players. Presentation number 3273 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  34. THE COMMON INFRASPINATUS MUSCLE TRAINING POSITION IS NOT THE MOST FUNCTIONAL

    Fujitake, S., Takemura, M., Ishida, T., Dehara, C., & Tsujita, J. (2012). Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus muscle during several shoulder elevation tasks. Presentation number 3276 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

    POWER

  35. TWO-MINUTE REST INTERVALS ARE BEST FOR POWER TRAINING

    Martorelli, S., Martorelli, A., Cunha, R., Pereira, M. C., Jesus, D., Rocha Jr., V., Brown, L. E., & Bottaro, M. (2012). Neuromuscular and metabolic responses to power training: Effects of different rest intervals. Presentation number 1864 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  36. POWER RATHER THAN STRENGTH IS A BETTER FITNESS PREDICTOR FOR OLDER ADULTS

    Hubble, K., Garver, K., Delaney, D., Ward, T., Gray, M., & Powers, M. (2012). Strength and power as predictors of functional fitness for senior adults. Presentation number 3096 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

    SPECIFICITY AND EXTENDED EFFECTS

  37. HEAVY RESISTANCE TRAINING COMPROMISES SPORT-SPECIFIC PRACTICE RESPONSES

    Doncaster, G. G., & Twist, C. (2012). Exercise-induced muscle damage from bench press exercise impairs arm cranking endurance performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 112. Online publication, April 23, 2012.

  38. TWO FORMS OF SQUATTING PRODUCE DIFFERENT AND SIMILAR ACTIVATION PATTERNS IN LEG MUSCLE GROUPS

    Petrella, J. K., Groussard, T. G., Towns, J. R., Hensarling, R. W., & Jung, A. P. (2012). Differences in electromyography activity of five lower limb muscles during one-legged and two-legged squats. Presentation number 1857 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  39. AN ALTERATION IN A RESISTANCE ACTIVITY RESULTS IN DIFFERENT MECHANICS

    Wright, K. D., Graham, S. M., Moir, G. L., & Connaboy, C. (2012). The effects of additional load on the occurrence of bilateral-deficit: mechanical or neural factors? Presentation number 2178 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  40. JUMPING FORMS AND RUNNING ECONOMY ARE UNRELATED

    Smoglia, J. M., Fleming, J. J., Hux, M. S., & Fradkin, A. J.(2012). Running economy is not related to jumping performance. Presentation number 1547 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

    CREATINE

  41. CREATINE NO BETTER THAN PLACEBO FOR STRENGTH TRAINING IN FEMALES

    Christensen, B., Stastny, S., Hilgers, S., Okamatsu, H., Manikowske, T., Youd, L., & Champa, J. (2011). Does creatine supplementation along with a resistance training program improve strength in women? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2959.

  42. PRE-PERFORMANCE CREATINE DOES NOT ASSIST SPRINT PERFORMANCE

    Gilbert, L., Reneau, P., & Ryan, M. (2011). The effect of an acute intake of creatine supplementation on intermittent sprints. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2962.

    STRETCHING

  43. STRETCHING REDUCES FUNCTIONAL STRENGTH IN THE HAMSTRINGS AND QUADRICEPS IN WOMEN

    Costa, P. B., Ryan, E. D., Herda, T. J., Walter, A. A., Valdez, A. M., & Cramer, J. T. (2011). Effects of dynamic stretching on peak torque and the hamstrings-to-quadriceps conventional and functional ratios. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 1643.

  44. STATIC-STRETCHING APPEARS TO RETARD RECOVERY FROM DOMS

    McGrath, R., Whitehead, J. R., Came, D. J., & Brinkert, R. H. (2011). Effects of two different post-exercise stretching modalities on delayed onset muscular soreness in adults. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 1728.

  45. ANTAGONIST STRETCHING DOES NOT HINDER JUMPING PERFORMANCE

    Davidson, P. W., Sawyer, J. C., Collins, S. M., Dunbar, C. C., Matthews, T. D., & Paolone, V. J. (2011). Acute effects of antagonist static stretching on vertical jump performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 1764.

  46. STRETCHING DOES NOT ALTER SUBMAXIMAL RUNNING PERFORMANCE IN FEMALES

    Henry, K., Nichols, D., Ford, S & Ben-Ezra, V. (2012). The effects of three different stretching routines on running economy in female distance runners. Presentation number 992 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  47. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT AFFECT ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE

    Donkin, J. L., Bradley, R. T., Polin, M., Martinez Jr., R., Quintana, R., Parker, D. L., & Faria, I. (2012). Static stretching does not effect time to completion in 20 km time-trials. Presentation number 993 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  48. SWIMMING PERFORMANCES AFFECTED SIMILARLY BY STATIC STRETCHING AND DYNAMIC WARM-UPS

    Whitehead, J. R., Moran, M. P., Guggenheimer, J. D., & Brinkert, R. H. (2012). The effects of static stretching warm-up versus dynamic warm-up on sprint swim performance. Presentation number 994 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  49. STATIC STRETCHING (<60 SECONDS) DOES NOT COMPROMISE PERFORMANCE

    Kay, A., & Blazevich, A. (2012). Effect of acute static stretch on maximal muscle performance: a systematic review. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44, 154-164.

  50. STATIC AND PNF STRETCHING REDUCE KNEE PEAK TORQUES IN FEMALES

    Johnson, K. D., Sun, J., Henry, R. N., & Marshall, A. (2012). Effects of static and PNF stretching on knee peak torque in aerobically trained female athletes. Presentation number 997 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  51. STRETCHING AND IMAGERY HAVE NO AFFECT ON ANAEROBIC CYCLING

    Claeys, J., Zakrajsek, R., Martinson, M., Smith, K., Hochgesang, S., Brewer, A., Ritchey, M., Edwards, A., Nesser, T., Gage, M., & Kingsley, J. D. (2012). The effect of stretching and motor imagery on anaerobic performance in trained cyclists. Presentation number 1885 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  52. PASSIVE STATIC-STRETCHING IMPROVES MOOD

    Costa, B. M., Guimaraes, T. T., Cerqueira, L. S., Carvalho, A. O., Pompeu, F. A., Deslandes, & A. C. (2012). Acute effect of a stretching session on electroencephalogram and behavioral responses in healthy young adults. Presentation number 2949 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  53. SHORT-DURATION STATIC-STRETCHING DOES NOT HINDER 100 m PERFORMANCE

    Tsai, U-J., Huang, H-W., Chen, P_H., Kuo, Y-H., Cheng, C-F., & Tang, W. T. (2012). Static stretching with short duration does not inhibit subsequent 100-m sprint performance in sprinters. Presentation number 3437 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  54. STRETCH STRAP SUBSTITUTES FOR PARTNER IN PNF STRETCHING

    Maddigan, M., Peach, A., & Behm, D. (2012). A comparison of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques: Partner-assisted vs. Theraband® stretch strap unassisted modalities. Presentation number 3346 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  55. DYNAMIC FLEXIBILITY EFFECTS WEAR-OFF IN 20 MINUTES

    Everett, L., & Beekley, M. (2012). The influence of recovery time following a dynamic warm-up on lower body balance and flexibility. Presentation number 1344 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

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