Volume 22(1): September, 2016

PRINCIPLES OF TRAINING 8

This first issue of Volume 22 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with principles and factors associated with training program content. Seven previous issues, namely Volume 1(1), Volume 4(1), Volume 7(1), Volume 10(1), Volume 13(1), Volume 16(1), and Volume 19(1) also dealt with this topic. The information from those seven sources as well as that contained in this issue, will yield an extensive knowledge base of recent research in training topics associated with sports conditioning.

This volume constitutes the commencement of the eighth cycle of topics embraced by this journal.

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. GENERAL EFFECTS AND FACTORS

  1. WORK EFFICIENCY IN HEAVY EXERCISE IS MORE COMPLEX THAN HYPOTHESIZED

    Cannon, D. T., Bowen, T. S., Murgatroyd, S. R., Bimson, W. E., Kemp, G. J., & Rossiter, H. B. (2012). ATP turnover and the coupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation during dynamic exercise in humans. Presentation 2206 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  2. METABOLIC DEMAND DRIVES THE OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS DURING THE EARLY STAGES OF INTENSE WORK

    Sylvester, J. L., Burdette, S. D., Cross, S. W., Idemudia, N. O., Curtis, J. H., Vingre, J. L., & Hill, D. W. (2012). The effect of work rate on oxygen uptake kinetics during exhaustive severe intensity cycling exercise. Presentation 2208 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  3. OXYGEN DELIVERY IS NOT A LIMITING FACTOR IN INTENSE EXERCISE IN NORMOXIA

    Christensen, P. M., Nordsborg, N., Nybo, L., Secher, N., Sander, M., & Bangsbo, J. (2012). Moderate hypoxia does not slow muscular oxygen uptake at the onset of intense exercise. Presentation 2213 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  4. LIFELONG TRAINING DOES DEVELOP HEALTHIER PHYSIOLOGIES AND FUNCTIONING THAN THAT WHICH OCCURS IN SEDENTARY INDIVIDUALS

    Howden, E. J., Carrick-Ranson, G., Fujimoto, N., Hastings, J. L., Bhella, P. S., Gandhi, N., Shibata, S., Boyd, K., Palmer, D., & Levine, B. D. (2013). The effect of lifelong training on fitness, blood volume and left ventricular morphology: impact of gender. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 386.

  5. TAPER PROMOTES EXTRA GROWTH IN FAST-TWITCH FIBERS

    Murach, K., Raue, U., Willkerson, B., Minchev, K., Jemiolo, B., Bagley, J., Luden, N., & Trappe, S. (2013). Molecular insight into fast-twitch muscle fiber remodeling with taper. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 755.

  6. CROSS-COUNTRY RUNNERS DO NOT ALWAYS TRAIN AT THE COACH-INTENDED INTENSITY

    Hagen, M. A., Bouchard, C. E., Donohue, J. M., Stenson, M. C., & Fischer, D. V. (2013). Do Division III cross-country runners experience the intended coach prescribed training impulse (TRIMP)? Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1230.

  7. TABATA EXERCISE IS APPROPRIATE FOR FITNESS TRAINING

    Olson, M. (2013). Tabata interval exercise: energy expenditure and post-exercise responses. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2143.

  8. STEP- OR EXPONENTIAL-DECAY TAPERS AFFECT ATHLETES SIMILARLY (QUESTIONABLE EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN)

    Rial, C. (2013). The analysis of two different types of tapers on exercise performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2163.

  9. WEARING COMPRESSION SHIRT SLEEVES ENHANCES BASEBALL PITCHING

    Menon, S., Witte, K. A., Novakovich, P. M., Andrews, J. R., & Russell, E. M. (2013). Compression shirts decrease pain and improve performance in youth pitchers. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2167.

  10. COMPRESSION GARMENTS DO NOT IMPROVE PERFORMANCE IN UPPER-BODY TRAINING

    Martorelli, S., Rocha Jr., V., Martorelli, A., Pereira, M. C., Brown, L. E., do Carmo, J., & Bottaro, M. (2014). Influence of graduated compression sleeves during upper-body power training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 906.

  11. MOTOCROSS RIDERS' RECOVERIES BENEFIT FROM WEARING COMPRESSION SLEEVES ALL DAY

    Nuesser, S. (2013). The effects of compression equipment on performance and recovery in motocross. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2138.

  12. VISION TRAINING POSITIVELY AFFECTS SOFTBALL SKILL TESTS

    Tallhamer, B., Bryner, R. W., Ryan, M., & Reneau, P. (2013). The effects of vision eye-training on softball skill performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2170.

  13. POST-ACTIVATION POTENTIATION DOES NOT WORK WITH FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    Conley, D. S., Molacek, D. R., Meier, M. T., McIntyre, A. C., & Evetovich, T. K. (2013). Post-activation potentiation has varying effects on vertical jump performance in collegiate football players. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2463.

  14. IN MALES, AGE 50 YEARS IS WHERE OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS START TO CHANGE

    Grey, T. M., Spencer, M. D., Murias, J. M., Belfry, G. R., & Paterson, D. H. (2013). The effect of age and training status on VO2 kinetics. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2482.

  15. HEART-RATE RECOVERY IS INFLUENCED BY PHYSICAL FITNESS STATE AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVEL BUT AT DIFFERENT STAGES OF THE RECOVERY

    Constantini, N. W., Olshinkq, N., Nice, S., & Scheinowitz, M. (2013). Correlation between physical fitness and physical activity level to heart rate recovery in healthy individuals. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2916.

  16. DANISH MALE LIGHTWEIGHT ROWERS EXHIBIT REDUCED BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND HEIGHTENED RATES OF RIB INJURIES

    Vinther, A., Alkjaer, T., Kanstrup, I.-L., Zerahan, B., Ekdahl, C., & Aagaard, P. (2012). Presentation 2729 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  17. WEIGHT LOSS IN LIGHTWEIGHT ROWERS REDUCES CAPACITY TO PERFORM

    Toma, K., & Hagerman, F. C. (2014). Effects of weight restriction on rowing performance among elite oarsmen. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 258.

  18. OXYGEN DELIVERY LIMITS MAXIMAL EXERCISE

    McMillan, D. W., Edmunds, R. M., Sanchez, E., & Astorino, T. A. (2014). Central hemodynamic response to various maximal exercise protocols. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1317.

    2. CONTENT

  19. SHORT-WORK LONG-REST SPRINT INTERVAL TRAINING INVOLVES SUB-MAXIMAL OXYGEN DEMANDS

    Freese, E. C., Gist, N. H., & Cureton, K. J. (2012). Physiological responses to an acute bout of sprint interval cycling. Presentation 2203 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  20. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL-TRAINING SPEEDS UP THE OXYGEN UPTAKE KINETICS AT LOWER AND UPPER MODERATE WORK LEVELS

    Williams, A. M., Paterson, D. H., & Kowalchuk, J. M. (2012). High-intensity interval training speeds VO2 kinetics in moderate-intensity exercise transitions initiated from elevated metabolic rates. Presentation 2212 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  21. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL-TRAINING AS EFFECTIVE AS TRADITIONAL SOCCER TRAINING

    Howard, N. F., & Stavrianeas, S. (2012). Effects of season-long high-intensity interval training on conditioning of high school soccer players. Presentation 2258 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  22. SHORTER VS. LONGER WORK INTERVALS ARE PERCEIVED TO BE LESS DEMANDING

    Kilpatrick, M., Greeley, S. J., Hubbard, E. A., Collins, L. H., & Ohara, J. L. (2012). Exertional responses to sprint interval training: a comparison of 30-second and 60-second conditions. .

  23. CONTINUOUS EXERCISE IS PERCEIVED TO BE HARDER THAN INTERVAL TRAINING

    Kilpatrick, M. W., & Greeley, S. (2013). Exertional responses to interval and continuous cycle ergometer exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1241.

  24. SHORT WORK:REST HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING IS MORE ENJOYABLE THAN CONTINUOUS OR LONGER WORK:REST INTERVAL TRAINING

    Martinez, N., Kilpatrick, M. W., Price, N., Buchanan, L., Robles, M., & Rubio, A. (2014). Affective and enjoyment responses to high-intensity interval training in overweight and sedentary individuals. Supplement abstract number 800.

  25. INTERVAL TRAINING AT ALL INTENSITIES IS MORE ENJOYABLE THAN HEAVY CONTINUOUS TRAINING

    Martinez, N., Greeley, S. J., Prendergrast, A., Harring, B., & Kilpatrick, M. W. (2013). A comparison of interval and continuous exercise on enjoyment. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2385.

  26. VETERAN/MASTERS CYCLISTS PERSIST WITH TRAINING FREQUENCY AND DISTANCE

    Macgregor, C., Reaburn, P. R., & Climstein, M. (2013). The effect of age on training practices in veteran cyclists: An Australian study. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 363.

  27. NON-SPECIFIC HIGH-INTENSITY TRAINING PRODUCES PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES IN A RUNNING TREADMILL TEST

    Gist, N. H., Freese, E. C., & Cureton, K. J. (2013). Comparison of responses to two high-intensity intermittent exercise protocols. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 372.

  28. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING HAS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS ON PLASMA VOLUME WHEREAS TRADITIONAL ENDURANCE-BASED TRAINING DOES NOT

    Alis, R., Ibanez-Sanial, S., Basterra, J., Verdejo, P., Martinez-Herraez, B., & Romagnoli, M. (2013). Effects on plasma viscosity of low-volume high-intensity interval training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 373.

  29. THE OXYGEN REQUIREMENT PER POWER UNIT STEADILY INCREASES WHEN PERFORMING ABOVE THE LACTATE THRESHOLD

    Homestead, E. P., Peterman, J. E., Contini, E. J., Kane, L. A., & Bynes, W. C. (2013). Alterations in the VO2-power relationship above the lactate threshold during a graded-bicycling exercise protocol. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 590.

  30. THE SHORTER THE EXERCISE BOUT THE GREATER THE DECREMENT IN GROSS EFFICIENCY

    Noordhof, D. A., Mulder, R. C., Malterer, K. R., Foster, C., & de Konig, J. J. (2013). Changes in gross efficiency in relation to time-trial length. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 602.

  31. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT CROSS-TRAINING ELEVATES VO2max

    Xu, Y. Z., Tsuji, K., Iemitsu, M., & Tabata. I.(2013). Effects of 2 days/w high-intensity intermittent cross training on maximal oxygen uptake. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), .

  32. SHORT-TERM HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING DOES NOT PRODUCE ADAPTATION IN SOME BLOOD PARAMETERS

    Wang, T. Y., Lee, M. M., & Chan, K. H.(2013). The adaptation of short-term high-intensity interval training on exercise-induced stresses. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2146.

  33. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING IMPROVES RUNNING PERFORMANCE IN FEMALE SOCCER PLAYERS

    West, B., Clark, I. E., Pettit, C. D., Murray, S. R., Kernozek, T. W., & Pettit, R. W. (2013). Applying the critical velocity model for an off-season interval training program. Supplement abstract number 2151.

  34. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING BETTER THAN CONTINUOUS TRAINING EVEN IN SEDENTARY INDIVIDUALS

    Sheperd, S., Wilson, O., Bradley, J., Clark, J., Cocks, M., Thogersen-Ntoumani, C., Taylor, A., Anton, W., & Shaw, C. (2013). Group-based high intensity interval training improves adherence and reduces cardio-metabolic risk factors in sedentary individuals. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2160.

  35. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING USES TIME MUCH MORE EFFICIENTLY THAN HIGH-VOLUME ENDURANCE TRAINING

    Cregg, C. J., Kelly, D., O'Connor, P. L., Daly, P., & Moyna, N. M. (2013). Effects of high-intensity interval training and high-volume endurance training on maximal aerobic capacity, speed and power in club level Gaelic football players. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2166.

  36. SHORT WORK AND REST PERIODS OF HIGH-INTENSITY EXERCISE ARE DESIRABLE FOR ACTIVITIES REQUIRING HIGH POWER OUTPUT

    Tucker, W. J., Malone, K., Sawyer, B. J., Bhammar, D. M., & Gaesser, G. A. (2013). Comparison of physiological responses to two high-intensity interval exercise protocols. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2809.

  37. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING AS EFFECTIVE AS TRADITIONAL ROTC PHYSICAL TRAINING

    Gist, N. H. (2014). Physiological and performance effects of low-volume, high-intensity whole-body calisthenics on army ROTC cadets. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 432.

  38. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL EXERCISE IMPROVES COGNITIVE RESPONSE TIMES

    Moxey, J. R., Perez, W. J., Jenkins, L. S., & Rynders, C. A. (2014). Effects of fasted versus fed high-intensity interval exercise on response time during a Stroop task. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 530.

  39. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING HAS BETTER HEALTH BENEFITS THAN MODERATE TRAINING

    Bopp, C. M., Gottschall, J. S., & Hastings, B. (2013). Comparative effects of moderate-intensity, continuous training versus high-intensity interval training in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 857.

  40. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING IS MUCH MORE EFFECTIVE THAN TRADITIONAL ENDURANCE TRAINING IN GAELIC FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    Kelly, D. T., Cregg, C. J., Tobin, C., O’Connor, P. L., & Moyna, N. M. (2014). Effect of interval and endurance training on selected physiological and performance indices in Gaelic football. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 942.

  41. VERY BRIEF HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING QUICKLY PRODUCES SIGNIFICANT AEROBIC ADAPTATIONS

    Groezinger, E. Y., Cox, R. H., McLean, T. R., & Sunderman, R. T. (2014). Effects of a short hit protocol on indices of aerobic training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 947.

  42. CORE-STABILITY TRAINING IS A QUESTIONABLE ACTIVITY FOR ATHLETES

    Haugen, T., Haugvad, L., & Rostad, V. (2016). Effects of core-stability training on performance and injuries in competitive athletes. Sportscience, 20, 1-7.

  43. RESISTANCE-EXERCISE PERFORMANCE FACTORS CHANGE DURING RESISTANCE-EXERCISE TAPERS IN YOUNG THROWERS

    Zaras, M., Stasinaki, A., Krase, A., Methenitis, S., Spengos, K., Karampatsos, G., Georgiadis, G., & Terzis, G. (2014). Effects of tapering with light vs. heavy loads on track and field throwing performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 956.

  44. CADENCE CHANGES ALTER THE INTENSITY OF HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL-TRAINING

    Del Vecchio, F. B. Del Vecchio, A. J., & Domingues, M. R. (2014). High-intensity interval-training: effects of cadence control on physiological variables and time-to-exhaustion. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1039.

  45. AGILITY TRAINING IMPROVES AGILITY IN VOLLEYBALL BLOCKING

    Meng, F.-W., Chan, M.-L., Yeh, T.-C., Wu, K.-H., & Cheng, H.-W. (2014). Effect of agility training on exercise performance in college males. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 941.

  46. WRESTLING PRACTICE CAUSES SIGNIFICANT SHORT-PERIOD CHANGES IN BODY COMPOSITION

    Bonitatis, M. P., Oakman, J. E., Desiderio, A. M., Neal, M. P., Cromwell, C. M., Ryder, C. W., Good, N. M., Lenzo, J. M., Aichele, K. R., Brown, M. D., & Feairheller, D. L. (2014). Effects of acute exercise on blood pressure and body composition in Division III wrestlers. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 248.

    3. SPRINT/ANAEROBIC TRAINING

  47. ANAEROBIC WORK CAPACITY IS A FIXED AMOUNT IN AN EXTENDED PERFORMANCE

    Malterer, K. R., Mulder, R., Noordhof, de Konig, J. J., & Foster, C. (2013). Constant anaerobically attributable work in relation to cycle time trail length. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 593.

  48. MUSIC DOES NOT AFFECT ANAEROBIC WORK

    Sherman, J., Hanson, R., & Richmond, S. (2013). Music choice has no influence on muscular endurance or anaerobic exercise performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2165.

  49. RESISTANCE AND SPRINT-INTERVAL TRAINING DO NOT INTERFERE WITH EACH OTHER

    Laird, R. H., Kennedy, S., Elmer, D., Barberio, M., Aslom, P., Lee, K., & Pascoe, D. D. (2014). Effect of concurrent sprint interval and resistance training on strength, power, and aerobic performance measures. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 934.

    4. ENDURANCE/AEROBIC TRAINING

  50. TRACK RUNNERS ARE HIGHER IN AEROBIC CAPACITY THAN ULTRA-MARATHONERS

    Sousa, A. C., Ribeiro, J., Sousa, M., Colaco, P., Pires, P., Vilas-Boas, J. B., & Fernandes, R. (2013). Aerobic power comparison between ultra-marathoners and track runners. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1976.

  51. ONE YEAR OF ENDURANCE TRAINING RAISES SENIORS' BLOOD VOLUME AND OXYGEN UPTAKE

    Palmer, D., Boyd, K., Carrick-Ranson, G., Fujimoto, N., Creson, D., Livingston, S., Hastings, J., & Levine, B. (2013). Blood volume increases with 1 year of endurance training in healthy seniors. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2050.

  52. CONTINUOUS AND INTERVAL MODERATE EXERCISE AFFECT TRAINING ADAPTATIONS SIMILARLY

    Lu, S.-Y., Tsao, L.-Y., & Chen, M.-H. (2013). Continuous versus intermittent exercise training: 8-week intervention outcomes in aerobic capacity and autonomic balance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2153.

  53. SWIMMERS HAVE SLOWEST VO2 KINETICS AMONG OTHER ENDURANCE SPORTS

    Sousa, A. C., Figueiredo, P., de Jesus, K., Colaco, P., Oliveira, E., Vilas-Boas, J. P., & Fernandes, R. (2014). Oxygen uptake kinetics at 100% of VO2max: Comparison between cyclic sports. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 372.

  54. ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS ARE LIMITED EVEN IN PREVIOUSLY SEDENTARY OLDER INDIVIDUALS

    Boyd, K. M., Palmer, D., Livingston, S., Parker, R., Riley, J., & Levine, B. D. (2014). “You get what you pay for”: Fitness improves only with increases in training load. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 917.

    5. PACING

  55. BETTER CYCLISTS EXHIBIT A MORE CONSISTENT PACING STRATEGY

    Turner, L. A., Tecklenburg-Lund, S., Thomas, K., Gibson, A., & Mickleborough, T. D. (2013). Variability of pacing strategies adopted by different category cyclists Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 597.

    6. RESPIRATORY TRAINING

  56. INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING HAS A POSITIVE EFFECT ON THE WORK OF BREATHING IN HEAVY EXERCISE

    Turner, L. A., Tecklenburg-Lund, S., Chapman, R. F., Stager, J. M., Duke, J. W., & Mickleborough, T. D. (2012). The effect of IMT on muscle deoxygenation during exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. Presentation 2240 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  57. THE WORK OF BREATHING IS SIGNIFICANT IN SEVERE-INTENSITY EXERCISE

    Cross, T. J., Winters, C., Constantini, N., & Sabapathy, S. (2013). The work of breathing and the slow-component of O2 uptake kinetics during strenuous exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2477.

  58. SWIMMING IS MUCH HARDER ON RESPIRATION THAN LAND-EXERCISES

    Sossong, T., & Stager, J. (2014). Ventilatory challenge of swimming and cycling in the development of global respiratory muscle fatigue. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 108.

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