Volume 13(1): September, 2007

PRINCIPLES OF TRAINING 5

This first issue of Volume 13 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with principles and factors associated with training program content. Four previous issues, namely Volume 1(1), Volume 4(1), Volume 7(1), and Volume 10(1), also dealt with this topic. The information from those four sources as well as that contained in this issue, will yield an extensive knowledge base of recent research in training topics associated with sports conditioning.

This volume constitutes the commencement of the fifth cycle of topics embraced by this journal.

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. GENERAL EFFECTS AND FACTORS

  1. DOPAMINE COULD BE AN EXERCISE STRESS INDICATOR

    Shannon, M. P., Smith, B., & Meeusen, R. (2004). Catecholamine responses to competition taper of elite athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1019.

  2. VANIL MANDELIC ACID RESPONSE REFLECTS MICROCYCLE ACTIVITY

    Claudio, L., Stanganelli, R., & Zucas, S. M. (2004). Monitoring physiological adaptations in male volleyball athletes during a microcycle of preparation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 2079.

  3. CONCENTRATING ON POWER PRODUCTION IS THE BEST PACING ORIENTATION

    Streeper, T., Peiffer, J., Faria, I. E., Quintana, R., & Parker, D. L. (2006).The effect of pacing strategy on O2 deficit during the first 5 Km of a 20 Km cycling time trial. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1534.

  4. SWIMMERS HAVE NOTABLE CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS THAT COULD AFFECT PERFORMANCE

    Kline, C. E., Youngstedt, S. D., Devlin, T. M., Lee, A. Y., Zielinski, M. R., Moore, T. A., Davis, M. J., & Durstine, J. L. (2006). Circadian variation in swim performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1543.

  5. SWIMMERS PERFORM BETTER AT NIGHT WHEN COMPARED TO MORNINGS

    Kline, C. E., Durstine, J. L., Davis, J. M., Moore, T. A., Devlin, T. M., Zielinski, M. R., & Youngstedt, S. D. (2007). Circadian variation in swim performance. Journal of Applied Physiology, 102, 641-649.

  6. POSTURAL CONTROL VARIES WITH TIME OF DAY

    Gribble, P., tucker, W. S., & White, P. A. (2006). The effects of time of day on static and dynamic postural control. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2407.

  7. GOING OUT SLIGHTLY FASTER IN 5-12 MINUTE EVENTS LEADS TO BETTER PERFORMANCE AND LESS EXERCISE STRAIN

    Zacharogiannis, E., Paradisis, G., Tziortzis, S., & Smirniotou, A. (2006). Metabolic and performance profile of pacing at peak VO2 velocity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2580.

  8. BRIGHT LIGHT PLUS EXERCISE STIMULATES CIRCADIAN SHIFT BEST

    Youngstedt, S. D., Kline, C. E., Zielinski, M. R., Moore, T. A., & Elliott, J. A. (2006). Circadian phase-shifting effects of bright light vs. exercise and bright light and exercise combined. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1005.

  9. TREADMILL AND FREE RUNNING ARE SIMILAR IN METABOLIC COST

    Moss, R. F., Caterisano, A., Patrick, B. T., Goodwin, F. J., & Leblanc, N. (2007). Comparison of VO2, ventilation, heart rate and blood lactate between treadmill and free range running. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 1417.

    2. CONTENT

  10. VISION TRAINING DOES NOT IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

    Merryman, A. R., & Abendroth-Smith, J. (2004). Vision training: Effects of motor skills and visual ability in experienced racquetball players. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 95.

  11. EFFECTS OF INTERVAL TRAINING ARE DETERMINED BY INTERVAL DURATION

    Appell, C. J., Rozenek, R., Carrizi, M., Lacourse, M., & Russo, A. (2004). Comparison of 2:1 work to rest ratios of variable duration on responses to intermittent running. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1407.

  12. MULTIPLE BOUT SHORT DURATION DAILY EXERCISE BURNS MORE FAT THAN SINGLE BOUT EXERCISE

    Liu, Y-S., & Hsieh, S. S. (2004). Effects of single bout long duration and multiple bouts short duration exercise on energy expenditure. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1897.

  13. CONSTANT TRAINING STIMULI INCREASE PERFORMANCE EFFICIENCY

    Schaetzmueller, V., Weber, S., Woestmann, R., Lopez, C. M., & Platen, P. (2005). Effects of constant versus stochastic training patterns on development of endurance performance in running. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 248.

  14. PHYSIOTHERAPY TREATMENTS MAY NOT BE AS VALID AS PATIENTS ASSUME THEM TO BE

    Murray, I. R., Murray, S. A., MacKenzie, K., & Coleman, S. (2005). How evidence based is the management of two common sports injuries in a sports injury clinic? British Journal of Sports Medicine, 39, 912-916.

  15. JUMP HEIGHT IS NOT DETERMINED BY RATE OF FORCE DEVELOPMENT

    Urginowitsch, C., Tricoli, V., Batista, M., Rodacki, A. L., & Ricard, M. D. (2006). Influence of training background on jumping height. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1823.

  16. TELEMETRIC DATA DURING A SIMULATED CYCLING RACE HAS NO BENEFIT

    Brown, J. D., Manfredi, T. G., & Blissmer, B. J. (2006). Effect of telemetric data on 17k time trial performance in trained cyclists. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2594.

  17. TRAINING WITH EYES CLOSED IMPROVES BALANCE

    Amundsen, A., Kuffel, E., & Seiler, S. (2006). Postural balance training: effects of training mode and training frequency. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1084.

    3. SPRINT/ANAEROBIC TRAINING

  18. TWO MINUTES IS TOO SHORT TO FULLY USE ANAEROBIC CAPACITY

    De Konig, J. J., Hettinga, F. J., Foster, C., Lampen, J., & Bobbert, M. F. (2004). Can anaerobic capacity be fully utilized in two minutes of supramaximal speed skating exercise? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 122.

  19. HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT TRAINING AFFECTS ARE SPECIFIC

    Mohr, M., Krustrup, P., Nielsen, J. J., Mybo, L., Rasmussen, K., Juel, C., & Bangsbo, J. (2005). Effect of two different training regimes on muscle adaptations and intermittent exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 1518.

  20. ANAEROBIC TRAINING IS IMPORTANT FOR REDUCING EXERCISE STRESS AND INJURY

    Bloomer, R. J., Falvo, M. J., Fry, A. C., Schilling, B. K., Smith, W. A., & Moore, C. A. 2006). Anaerobic exercise does not result in oxidative stress or skeletal muscle injury in trained men. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2185.

  21. HIGH-INTENSITY TRAINING PROVOKES HAEMATURIA AND REQUIRES EXTENDED RECOVERY

    Li, Z. J., Zhaang, Y., Gou, B., Yan, J. H., Ma, G. Q., & Liu, M. (2006). Effect of interval high-intensity uphill training in cyclists. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2609.

  22. WHOLE-BODY VIBRATION EXPOSURES DOES NOT IMPROVE SPRINTING PERFORMANCE

    Guggenheimer, J. D., Tveden, R., Reyes, G. F., Silvers, W. M., & Dolny, D. G. (2007). Effects of whole-body vibration exposure on 40-meter sprint times. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 1424.

    4. ENDURANCE/AEROBIC TRAINING

  23. FEMALE DISTANCE RUNNERS SHOULD EXPERIMENT WITH GOING OUT "FASTER"

    Kenefick, R. W., DeCamp, A. E., Edwards, D. G., & Quinn, T. J. (2004). Does pacing strategy affect 5-km running performance in competitive female distance runners? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 833.

  24. RESISTANCE TRAINING MAKES ENSUING AEROBIC TRAINING HARDER

    Riebe, D., Morrell, C. a., Ward, C. L., Blissmer, B., Maher, J. F., & Silva, J. E. (2004). The effects of exercise order on the perceptual response to cardiovascular and resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 916.

  25. ENDURANCE TRAINING INCREASES SWEAT RATE

    Kondo, N., Yanagimoto, S., Kuwahara, T., Zhang, Y., Koga, S., & Inoue, Y. (2004). Heat loss responses at the onset of dynamic exercise in endurance-trained men under mildly heated conditions. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 2138.

  26. AEROBIC RESPONSES ARE ALTERED WHEN AEROBIC TRAINING OCCURS AFTER RESISTANCE TRAINING

    Ward, C. L., Morrell, C. A., Riebe, D., Maher, J., & Manfredi, T. G. (2004). The effects of resistance exercise on metabolic responses to subsequent aerobic exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 2378.

  27. NO ORDER EFFECT FOR RESISTANCE AND CARDIORESPIRATORY TRAINING

    Stednitz, B. M., Moore, M., Babl, R. M., Whitehead, M. T., Webster, M. J., & Scheett, T. P. (2005). Effect of concomitant training order on performance and metabolic responses. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 974.

  28. HIGHER INTENSITY AEROBIC TRAINING IS APPROPRIATE FOR CHILDREN

    Mascarenhas, L. P., Neto, A. S., Brum, V. P., DaSilva, S. G., & De Campos, W. (2006). The effects of two aerobic training intensities on aerobic and anaerobic power of prepubescent boys. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1486.

  29. CONTINUOUS AEROBIC TRAINING PRODUCES A REPEATED-SPRINT PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT IN NON-SPECIALIZED SUBJECTS

    Glaister, M., Stone, M. H., Stewart, A. M., Hughes, M. G., & Moir, G. L. (2006). The influence of endurance training on multiple sprint cycling performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2578.

  30. HIGH INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING PRODUCES BETTER AEROBIC EFFECTS THAN CONTINUOUS TRAINING

    Helgerud, J., Høydal, K. L., Wang, E., Karlsen, T., Berg, P. R., Bjerkaas, M., Simonsen, T., Helgesen, C. S., Hjorth, N. L., Bach, R., & Hoff, J. (2006). Differential response to aerobic endurance training at different intensities. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2581.

  31. MIDDLE DISTANCE RUNNING PERFORMANCE IS A FUNCTION OF VO2max AND RUNNING ECONOMY

    Nevill, A. M., Ingham, S. A., Pedlar, C., Dunman, N., & Whyte, G. (2007). Identifying the optimal determinants of elite 800m and 1500m running performance. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 1413.

    5. TAPER

  32. ILLNESS DURING TAPER IS LIKELY TO IMPAIR SWIMMING PERFORMANCE

    Pyne, D. B., Fricker, P. A., Gleeson, M., & Hopkins, W. G. (2004). The practical significance of illness on competitive performance in international swimmers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1766.

  33. TAPERING IMPROVES PERFORMANCE AND ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSES

    Vollaard, N. B., Shearman, J. P., & Cooper, C. E. (2004). The oxidative stress response to exercise is unchanged after tapering, but antioxidant defenses are improved. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1765.

  34. RUNNING ECONOMY AT SPEEDS USED IN TRAINING IMPROVES IN TAPER

    Contreras, B. E., D’Acquisto, L. J., Nethery, V., & Burnham, T. (2003). Taper improves running economy but not velocity at lactate threshold in distance runners. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 202.

  35. LEPTIN LEVELS CAN BE USED TO INDICATE TRAINING AND TAPER RESPONSES

    Jurimae, J., Maestu, J., & Jurimae, T. (2003). Effect on intense training and following tapering on leptin and stress hormones in rowers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 204.

  36. TAPER RESTORES POWER IN 7-10 DAYS IN SWIMMERS

    Trinity, J. D., Pahnke, M. D., & Coyle, E. F. (2005). Maximal power measured during a taper in collegiate swimmers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 249.

  37. ANAEROBIC WORK CAPACITY NOT RELATED TO SWIMMING PERFORMANCES; TAPER IMPROVES PERFORMANCES

    Papoti, M., Zagatto, A. M., Cunha, S. A., Martins, E. B., Manchado, F. B., Freitas, P. B., Araujol, G. G., & Gobatto, C. A. (2006). Effects of taper on critical velocity, anaerobic work capacity and distance performances in trained swimmers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1574.

  38. SOME HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ARE AFFECTED BY A TAPER IN SWIMMING

    Santhiago, V., da Silva, A. D., & Gobatto, C. A. (2006). Effects of taper on some hormonal and biochemical overtraining markers in high performance swimmers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1584.

  39. THREE IS BETTER THAN A FOUR WEEK TAPER IN SWIMMING

    Trinity, J. D., Pahnke, M. D. & Coyle, E. F. (2003). Effect of taper duration on the time course for changes in maximal power of elite female swimmers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1622.

  40. TRAINING VOLUME REDUCTION IS MOST EFFECTIVE FORM OF A TAPER

    Bosquet, L., Montpetit, J., Arvisais, D., & Mujika, I. (2007). Effects of tapering on performance: A meta-analysis. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 1464.

    6. UNTRA-SHORT TRAINING

  41. ULTRA-SHORT TRAINING STIMULATES BOTH AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    Yamamoto, N., Isaka, T., Wada, T., Sakurama, K., Takenoya, F., Yanagi, H., & Hashimoto, M. (2004). The maintenance of anaerobic power in intermittent short-duration high intensity exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1427.

  42. SHORT PERIOD ULTRA-SHORT TRAINING PRODUCES GREATER ENERGY EXPENDITURE THAN LONGER PERIODS

    Trapp, G., Boutcher, Y. N., & Boutcher, S. H. (2004). Oxygen uptake response to high intensity intermittent cycle exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1900.

    7. INSPIRATORY TRAINING

  43. RESPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING IMPROVES RESPIRATORY MUSCLE FUNCTION BUT NOT TIME-TRIAL PERFORMANCE

    Butts, C. J., Swenson, T., & Pfaff, T. (2005). Effect of respiratory muscle training on 20 km cycling time-trial performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 425.

  44. INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING IMPROVES INSPIRATORY MUSCLE FUNCTION BUT NOT AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Downey, A., Chenoweth, L. M., Townsend, D. K., Ferguson, C. S., Ranum, J., & Harms, C. A. (2005). The effect of inspiratory muscle training on hypoxic exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 2320.

  45. INSPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING DOES NOT IMPROVE ROWING PERFORMANCE

    Vrabas, I. S., & Riganas, C. S. (2005). Inspiratory muscle training: Effects on performance in well-trained rowers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 2321.

  46. RESPIRATORY MUSCLE TRAINING IMPROVES SWIMMING PERFORMANCES

    Wylegala, J. A., Pendergast, D. R., Gosselin, L., Warkander, D. E., & Lundgren, C. C. (2005). The effect of respiratory muscle training on swimming endurance in divers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 2323.

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