Volume 23(3): February, 2018

ALTITUDE TRAINING 8

This third issue of Volume 23 of Coaching Science Abstracts is the eighth issue that reviews articles concerned with altitude training. It adds to the abstracts presented in Volume 2(4), Volume 5(4), Volume 8(4), Volume 11(4), Volume 14(4), Volume 17(4), and Volume 20(3). Many of the research problems noted in those issues persist to this day.

[Editor's note: In this and previous issues related to this topic, altitudes greater than 2,500 m are often referenced. It is a rare event where serious sporting competitions are held at altitudes greater than 2,500 m that being a legacy of the 1968 Mexico Olympic Games. For altitudes greater than 3,000 m, the relevance of those studies is more appropriate for mountain climbing and some military activities. When reading these abstracts, this difference should be remembered and exact credence for sports be given to studies that relate findings at altitudes no higher than 2,500 m.]

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    ALTITUDE ADAPTATION

  1. BRIEF AEROBIC TRAINING AT ALTITUDE IMPROVES AEROBIC FACTORS

    Jongekrijg, L., Clancy, S., Murawske, J., & Davis, J. E. (2013). Effects of aerobic and anaerobic training on aerobic capacity and blood hematology at 3400 meters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2173 .

  2. CLINICAL SICKNESS AT ALTITUDE AFFECTS THE HEART RATE RESPONSE

    DiPasquale, D. M., Strangman, G. E., & Muza, S. R. (2013). Altitude vs. hypoxia: comparing the effects of exercise in hypobaric and normobaric hypoxia on resting heart rate. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2706.

  3. PROTEIN SUPPLEMENTATION AT HIGH ALTITUDE LEADS TO A REDUCTION IN BODY MEASUREMENTS WHILE BODY MASS IS MAINTAINED

    Carnauba, R. A., Marques, N., Baptistella, A. B., Naves, A., Paschoal, V., & Nicastro, H. (2014). Effects of protein supplementation on body composition and metabolic markers after mountain ascent - A pilot study. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 384.

  4. BEETROOT JUICE MAY BE HELPFUL IN EARLY ACCLIMATIZATION TO ALTITUDE

    Choi, H. S., Jeon, Y. N., Lim, C. H., Kim, C. K., & Park, S. J. (2014). Effect of dietary nitrate supplementation in the early stage of acclimatization in moderate hypoxia. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1559.

  5. BEETROOT JUICE SUPPLEMENTATION DOES NOT AID PERFORMANCE OF OXYGEN KINETICS

    Morris, D., Arms, J., & Collier, S. (2014). Effects of beetroot supplementation on oxygen consumption, arterial oxygen saturation, and exercise performance in hypoxia. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1560.

  6. SHORT-TERM NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA TRAINING ENHANCES AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC CAPACITIES IN MALE SWIMMERS

    Suzuki, Y., Kamei, A., & Kawahara, T. (2014). Short-term simulated altitude training camp using normobaric hypoxia swimming pool improve aerobic and anaerobic capacity. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1565.

  7. TRAINING STATUS DOES NOT INFLUENCE PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO SIMULATED ALTITUDE

    Puype, J., & Hespel, P. (2014). Predicting the effects of acute normobaric hypoxia on exercise performance from physiological measurements at rest. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1566.

  8. HEMOGLOBIN MASS CHANGES VARY GREATLY AMONG SWIMMERS AT ALTITUDE TRAINING CAMPS

    Wachsmith, N. B., Kelley, M., Feriche, B., Calderon, C., Iglesias, X., Rodriguez, F. A., & Schmidt, W. F. (2014). Influencing factors on the erythropoietic response during altitude training (Altitude Project). Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1575.

    ALTITUDE AND PERFORMANCE

  9. ALTITUDE DECREASES MARKSMANSHIP

    Swain, D. P., Moore, C. M., Ringleb, S. I., & Morrison, S. (2013). The effects of acute hypoxia on marksmanship. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2713.

  10. PLAYING AT ALTITUDE IS LIKELY TO AFFECT THE PERFORMANCE OF FEMALE SEA-LEVEL RESIDING SOCCER PLAYERS

    Bohner, J. D., Hoffman, J. R., McCormack, W. P., Scanlon, T. C., Townsend, J. R., Jajtner, A. R., Fukuda, D. J., Fragala, M S., & Stout, J. R. (2014). The effect of altitude on game performance in collegiate soccer players. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 238.

  11. FEMALE LONG-SPRINTERS BENEFIT FROM SHORT-TERM HYPOXIC TRAINING

    Oriishi, M., Matsubayashi, T., Kawahara, T., & Suzuki, Y. (2014). Short-term hypoxic exposure and training improve anaerobic capacity in long sprinters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1567.

  12. HYPOXIA REDUCES POWER AND SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL VARIABLES

    Tschakert, G., Ofner, M., Wonisch, M., Frei, M., Domej, W., Kroepfl, J., Mueller, A., Moster, O., & Hofmann, P. (2014). Determination of lactate turn points in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1569.

    LIVE HIGH (Hypobaric Hypoxia) - TRAIN LOW (Normobaric Normoxia)

  13. POST-ALTITUDE LHTL TRAINING RUNNING TIMES IMPROVE AFTER THREE WEEKS OF SEA-LEVEL ACCLIMATIZATION

    Laymon, A. S., Wilhite, D. P., Duke, J. W., Stickford, J. L., Stager, J. M., Mickleborough, T. D., & Chapman, R. F. (2012). Time-course of changes in cardiorespiratory measures post-altitude training: Implications for competitive endurance performance. Presentation 2158 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  14. RECOVERY AT ALTITUDE INHIBITS MITOCHONDRIAL DEVELOPMENT

    Slivka, D., Heesch, M., Cuddy, J., Hailes, W., Dumke, C., & Ruby, B. (2013). Mitochondrial related gene expression is suppressed after simulated high altitude exposure. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2711.

    GENERAL

  15. RHODIOLA CRENULATA PLUS CRODYCEPS SINENSIS SUPPLEMENTATION REDUCES THE EFFECTS OF ALTITUDE ON BRAIN HEMOGLOBIN

    Ho, C.-T., Lin, C.-H., Su, C.-L., Chen, C.-C., Cheng, L.-L, & Chen, C.-Y. (2013). Effect of Rhodiola Crenulata plus Crodyceps Sinensis supplementation on muscle and brain oxygenation levels following short-term altitude training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2403.

  16. RHODIOLA CRENULATA AND CORDYCEPS SINENSIS SUPPLEMENTATION DURING ALTITUDE TRAINING IMPROVES AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Chen, C.-Y., Lin, C.-H., Liao, Y.-H., Hung, T.-C., Hou, C.-W., Chen, C.-C., & Cheng, L.-L. (2013). Rhodiola Crenulata and Cordyceps Sinensis based supplementation enhance the aerobic exercise performance after two weeks of altitude training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2404.

  17. NO GENDER DIFFERENCES IN VENTILATORY RESPONSES WHEN EXPOSED TO NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA (3,500 m)

    Kambis, K. Yasukawa, M., Moran, T., Pleasant, A., Hafner, G., Barbour, V., Duckworthe, C., Muggleworth, A., Lautzenheiser, K., Lautenheiser, L., Vold, A., & Brophy, R. (2014). Pet CO2 and SpO2 gender differences upon acute exposure to normobaric hypoxic environments simulating 3,500 m. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1562.

  18. BLOOD LACTATE AND PERCEIVED EXERTION ARE HIGHER WHEN EXERCISING IN HYPOXIA

    Bliss, M. V., Seo, Y., & Glickman, E. L. (2014). Aerobic fitness does not affect blood lactate and carbohydrate metabolism during exercise in hypoxia. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1571.

  19. HYPOXIA AND HYPEROXIA DO NOT HAVE SYMMETRICAL EFFECTS WHEN COMPARED TO NORMOXIA

    Uchimaru, J., Cao, Y., Takemura, H., Takahasi, H., & Suzuki, S. (2014). Effects of acute hypoxia and hyperoxia on oxygen uptake and muscle oxygenation during incremental exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 46(5), Supplement abstract number 1572.

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