Volume 20(3): February, 2015

ALTITUDE TRAINING 7

This third issue of Volume 20 of Coaching Science Abstracts is the seventh issue that reviews articles concerned with altitude training. It adds to the abstracts presented in Volume 2(4), Volume 5(4), Volume 8(4), Volume 11(4), Volume 14(4), and Volume 17(4). Many of the research problems noted in those issues persist to this day.

[Editor's note: In this and previous issues related to this topic, altitudes greater than 2,500 m are often referenced. It is a rare event where serious sporting competitions are held at altitudes greater than 2,500 m that being a legacy of the 1968 Mexico Olympic Games. For altitudes greater than 3,000 m, the relevance of those studies is more appropriate for mountain climbing and some military activities. When reading these abstracts, this difference should be remembered and exact credence for sports be given to studies that relate findings at altitudes no higher than 2,500 m.]

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. ALTITUDE ADAPTATION

  1. HEMOGLOBIN MASS INCREASES WITH ALTITUDE EXPOSURE

    Garvican, L., Martin, D., Quod, M., Stephens, B., Sassi, A., & Gore, C. (2012). Time course of the hemoglobin mass response to natural altitude training in elite endurance cyclists. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 22, 95-103.

  2. HEART RATE VARIABILITY CHANGES WITH ALTITUDE ADAPTATION

    Rodriguez, F. A., Iglesias, X., Feriche, B., Calderon, C., Abalos, X., Vazquez, J., Barrero, A., Rodriguez, L., Hynynen, E., & Levine, B. D. (2012). Effects of altitude training on heart rate variability in orthostatic test in elite swimmers. Presentation 1562 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  3. ADOLESCENTS ADAPT TO ALTITUDE IN ABOUT 12 DAYS

    Drum, S. N., & Clark, H. M. (2013). Physiological changes in experienced adolescent distance runners after 12 days at altitude. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 690.

  4. AEROBIC TRAINING PRODUCES GREATER AEROBIC AND HEMATOLOGICAL ALTITUDE ACCLIMATIZATION THAN DOES ANAEROBIC TRAINING

    Jongekrijg, L., Clancy, S., Murawske, J., & Davis, J. E. (2013). Effects of aerobic and anaerobic training on aerobic capacity and blood hematology at 3,400 meters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2173.

  5. BRAIN HEMOGLOBIN IS REDUCED BY ALTITUDE TRAINING AND ADAPTATION

    Ho, C-T., Lin, C-H., Su, C-L., Chen, C-C., Cheng, L-L., Chen, C-Y. (2013). Effects of Rhodiola crenulata plus Crodyceps sinensis supplementation on muscle and brain oxygenation levels following short-term altitude training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2403.

  6. HYPOXIA/ALTITUDE AFFECTS EMOTIONAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL FACTORS

    Giampa, S. Q., Souza, J. F., de Mello, M. T., Santos, R. V., & Antunes, H. K. (2013). Affective and physiological responses of maximal exercise realized in simulated hypoxia. Supplement abstract number 2704.

  7. EXERCISE AT 4,500 m INDUCES NEGATIVE MOOD CHANGES

    Souza, J. F., Giampa, S. Q., de Mello, M. T., Santos, R. V., & Antunes, H. K. (2013). Changes in mood and oxygen saturation after physical exercise realized in simulate hypoxia. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2705.

  8. RESTING HEART RATE AT ALTITUDE IS SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECTED BY ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS

    DiPasquale, D. M., Strangman, G. E., & Muza, S. R. (2013). Altitude vs. hypoxia: Comparing the effects of exercise in hypobaric and normobaric hypoxia on resting heart rate. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2706.

  9. ALTITUDE AFFECTS OXYGEN DEBT AND DEFICIT AND THE ONSET OF BLOOD LACTATE ACCUMULATION

    Gooding, B., Cole, J., Hicks, D., Clark, M., & Davis, J. E. (2013). Effects of moderate altitude on oxygen debt, oxygen deficit, and the onset of blood lactate during exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2818.

    2. ALTITUDE AND PERFORMANCE

  10. ALTITUDE TRAINING CAMPS DO NOT ENHANCE ELITE SWIMMERS' PERFORMANCES

    Gough, C. E., Saunders, P. U., Fowlie, J., Savage, B., Pyne, D. B., Anson, J. M., Wachsmith, N., Prommer, N., & Gore, C. J. (January 12, 2012). Influence of altitude training modality on performance and total haemoglobin mass in elite swimmers. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 112. Published on line DOI 10.1007/s00421-011-2291-7.

  11. PERFORMANCE DIFFERS BETWEEN HYPOBARIC AND NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA

    Beidleman, B. A., Staab, J. A., Fulco, C. S., Cymerman, A., & Murza, S. R. (2012). Time-trial performance is impaired to a greater degree in hypobaric versus normobaric hypoxia at the same ambient PO2. Presentation 2155 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

  12. RUNNING ECONOMY ACCOUNTS FOR PERFORMANCE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN KENYAN AND EUROPEAN DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Mooses, M., Jurimae, J., Haile, D., & Pitsiladis, Y. (2013). Maximal aerobic exercise capacity and running economy of elite Kenyan middle- and long-distance runners compared with European runners. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1754.

  13. RHODIOLA CRENULATA AND CORDYCEPS SINENSIS SUPPLEMENTATION AT ALTITUDE IMPROVES AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Chen, C-Y., Lin, C-H., Liao, Y-H., Hung, T-C., Hou, C-W., Chen, C-C., & Cheng, L-L. (2013). Rhodiola crenulata and Cordyceps sinensis based supplementation enhance the aerobic exercise performance after two weeks of altitude training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2404.

  14. ALTITUDE/HYPOXIA SLOWS RECOVERY FROM AEROBIC ACTIVITY

    Ballmann, C. G., McGinnis, G., Peters, B., Quindry, J., Cuddy, J., Hales, W., Dumke, C., Ruby, B., & Slivka, D. (2013). Effect of hypoxic recovery post-exercise on blood oxidative stress markers Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2699.

  15. MARKSMANSHIP IS IMPAIRED AT ALTITUDES BEYOND 3,000 m

    Swain, D. P., Moore, C. M., Ringleb, S. I., & Morrison, S. (2013). The effects of acute hypoxia on marksmanship. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2713.

    3. LIVE HIGH (Hypobaric Hypoxia) - TRAIN LOW (Normobaric Normoxia)

  16. HiLo ALTITUDE TRAINING HAS EFFECTS ON PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES AT SEA-LEVEL BUT EFFECTS ON POST-ALTITUDE PERFORMANCES ARE NOT CLEAR

    Laymon, A. S., Wilhite, D. P., Duke, J. W., Stickford, J. L., Stager, J. M., Mickleborough, T. D., & Chapman, R. F. (2012). Time-course of changes in cardiorespiratory measures post-altitude training: Implications for competitive endurance performance. Presentation 2158 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012 .

  17. ALTITUDE TRAINING DOES NOT IMPROVE RUNNER'S PERFORMANCES IN ANY CONSISTENT WAY ALTHOUGH PHYSIOLOGICAL CAPACITIES DO IMPROVE

    Robertson, E. Y., Saunders, P. U., Pyne, D. B., Aughey, R. J., Anson, J. M., & Gore, C.J. (2010). Reproducibility of performance changes to simulated live high/train low altitude. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42, 394-401.

  18. MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION REDUCED AFTER EXTENDED STAYS AT ALTITUDE

    Slivka, D., Heesch, M., Cuddy, J., Hailes, W., Dumke, C., & Ruby, B. (2013). Mitochondrial related gene expression is suppressed after simulated high-altitude exposure. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1810.

    4. GENERAL

  19. EXPIRATORY AIR FLOW LIMITATION AFFECTS ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE AT MODERATE ALTITUDE

    Weavil, J. C., Stickford, J. A., Duke, J. W., Chapman, R. F., Stager, J. M., & Mickelborough, T. D. (2013). Impact of expiratory flow limitation on performance at simulated altitude. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1748.

  20. RECOMBINANT HUMAN ERYTHROPOIETIN ADMINISTRATION AFFECTS SEA-LEVEL AND ALTITUDE-ADAPTED RUNNERS SIMILARLY

    Wondimu, D. H., Durussel, J., Mekonnen, W. Anjila, E., Ongaro, N., Rutto, M., Wilson, T., Mooses, M., Daskalaki, E., & Pitsiladis, Y. P. (2013). Blood parameters and running performance of Kenyan and Caucasian endurance trained males after rHuEpo administration. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1758.

  21. TARAHUMARA INDIAN RUNNERS' HEARTS RECOVER FULLY WITHIN 24 HOURS OF AN ULTRA-DISTANCE RACE AT ALTITUDE

    Christensen, D. L., Espino, D., Cervantes, M., Infante, R., Hassager, C., & Kjaergaard, J. (2013). Echocardiographic assessment of the heart in ultra-distance running at altitude in Mexican Tarahumara Indians. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 1971.

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