Volume 14(4): February, 2009

ALTITUDE TRAINING 5

This fourth issue of Volume 11 of Coaching Science Abstracts is the fifth issue that reviews articles concerned with altitude training. It adds to the abstracts presented in Volume 2(4), Volume 5(4), Volume 8(4), and Volume 11(4). Many of the research problems noted in those issues persist to this day.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ALTITUDE ADAPTATION

  1. MODERATE-ALTITUDE-ADAPTED INDIVIDUALS HAVE NO ADVANTAGES FOR HIGHER ALTITUDE ADAPTATIONS

    Beidleman, B. A., Fulco, C. S., Zupan, M. F., Muza, S. R., Rock, P. B., Payn, T., Hannon, M., & Cymerman, A. (2005). Sea level and moderate altitude residents experience a similar decrement in VO2peak upon ascent to 4300 m. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 1555.

  2. ALTITUDE TRAINING REDUCES LEAN BODY MASS

    Sucec, A. A., Hodgson, J. A., Hazard, A. A., & Roy, B. A. (2006). Body mass and lean body mass loss during residence at moderate altitude (2450 m) in female and male runners. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2727.

  3. CYCLIC VARIABLE ALTITUDE CONDITIONING INCREASES ARTERIAL OXYGEN SATURATION

    Hetzler, R. K., Sargent, R. W., Kimura, I. F., Burgess, L., LaBotz, M., Nichols, A., & Nakasone, K. (2006). The effect of a cyclic variable altitude conditioning program on arterial oxygen saturation acclimation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2733.

  4. CHILDREN'S HEART RATE RESPONDS DIFFERENTLY TO ADULTS AT ALTITUDE

    Kriemler, S., Zehnder, M., Kohler, M., Brunner, H., & Boutellier, U. (2006). Maximal aerobic performance of prepubertal children upon fast ascent to high altitude. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2739.

  5. INTERMITTENT ALTITUDE EXPOSURE IS AS ADAPTIVE AS CONSTANT EXPOSURE

    Beidleman, B. A., Muza, S. T., Fulco, C. S., Cymerman, A., Sawka, M. N., Lewis, S. T., & Skrinar, G. S. (2008). Seven intermittent exposures to altitude improves exercise performance at 4300 m. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 40, 141-148.

  6. ALTITUDE RESIDENTS RESPOND TO SEA-LEVEL EXERCISE DIFFERENTLY TO SEA-LEVEL RESIDENTS

    Brothers, M. D., Hilger, K., Carson, J. M., Sullivan, L., & Byrnes, W. C. (2007). GXT responses in altitude-acclimatized cyclists during sea-level simulation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 39, 1727-1735.

  7. BLOOD FACTORS INCREASED BY LOW ALTITUDE TRAINING

    Frese, F., Eisenkolb, E., Schmidt, W. F., Bartsch, P., & Friedmann, B. (2008). Effects of repetitive training at low altitude on erythropoiesis in elite 400 m and 800 m runners. ACSM 55th Annual Meeting Indianapolis, Presentation Number, 1266.

  8. ALTITUDE EXPOSURE STIMULATES INCREASED EPO IN DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Chapman, R. F., Derchak, P. A., Stager, J. M., Stray-Gundersen, J., & Levine, B. D. (2008). Erythropoietin production at moderate altitude in elite endurance athletes is not mediated by peripheral chemoresponsiveness. ACSM 55th Annual Meeting Indianapolis, Presentation Number, 1267.

  9. ERYTHROPOIETIN RESPONSE TO ALTITUDE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH HEMOGLOBIN CHANGES IN TRAINED ATHLETES

    Friedmann, B., Frese, F., Menold, E., Kauper, F., Jost, J., & Bartsch, P. (2005). Individual variation in the erythropoietic response to altitude training in elite junior swimmers. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 39(3), 148-153.

  10. STAGING AT MODERATE ALTITUDE ACCLIMATES INDIVIDUALS TO PERFORM BETTER AT HIGHER ALTITUDES

    Fulco, C. S., Muza, S. R., Beidleman, B., Jones, J., Lammi, E., Kambis, K., Doan, B. K., Brothers, M. D., Zupan, M. F., & Cymerman, A. (2008). Living for six days at 2,200 m improves prolonged time-trial performance of sea-level residents exposed to 4,300 m. ACSM 55th Annual Meeting Indianapolis, Presentation Number, 1273.

    ALTITUDE AND PERFORMANCE

  11. MODERATE HYPOXIA DOES NOT AFFECT VERY SHORT SPRINT PERFORMANCES

    Friedman, B., Frese, F., Menold, E., & Bartasch, P. (2005). Effects of acute moderate hypoxia on anaerobic capacity in endurance-trained runners. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 1547.

  12. INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA OF LITTLE VALUE TO RUGBY PLAYERS PERFORMING AT ALTITUDE

    Hamlin, M. J., Hinckson, E. A., Wood, M. R., & Hopkins, W. G. (2004). Effect of intermittent normobaric hypoxic exposure at rest on rugby players' performance at 1650 m. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2731.

  13. INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA DOES NOT AFFECT MOVEMENT SPEED BUT DOES AFFECT POWER

    Wood, M. R., Hamlin, M. J., Hinckson, E. A., & Hopkins, W. G. (2006). Physical performance after adaptation to different protocols of intermittent hypoxia. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2732.

  14. TRAINING, NOT HYPOXIC EXPOSURE, INFLUENCES PERFORMANCE

    Austin, K. G., Haymes, E., Hansen, J., & Laird, M. (2006). The effect of intermittent hypoxic exposure on hematological markers and exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 903.

  15. INTERMITTENT HYPOXIC TRAINING COULD BE DETRIMENTAL TO SEA-LEVEL RUGBY PERFORMANCE

    Hinckson, E. A., Hamlin, M. J., Hopkins, W. G., & Wood, M. R. (2006). Effect of intermittent normobaric hypoxic exposure on sea-level performance in rugby players. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 907.

  16. HYPOXIC TRAINING DOES NOT IMPROVE SEA-LEVEL CYCLING PERFORMANCE

    Roels, B., Bentley, D. J., Coste, O., Mercier, J., & Millet, G. P. (2006). Effects of intermittent hypoxic training on altitude and sea-level cycling performance in well-trained athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 908.

  17. MUCH INDIVIDUAL AND GENDER VARIATION IN MODERATE-ALTITUDE RESIDENTS WHEN EXPOSED TO SEA-LEVEL

    Brothers, M. D., Hilger, K., Carson, J. M., Sullivan, L., & Byrnes, W. C. (2007). GXT responses in altitude acclimatized cyclists during sea level simulation. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 922.

  18. QUALIFIED INCREASE IN SUBMAXIMAL PERFORMANCE FOLLOWING ALTITUDE TRAINING

    Martin, D. T., Quod, M., Garvican, L. A., Etxebarrial, N., Stephens, B., Impellizzeri, F. M., Rampinini, E., Sassi, A., & Gore, C. J. (2008). Cycling economy following a 3-wk natural altitude training camp (~2700 m) in nationally competitive cyclists. ACSM 55th Annual Meeting Indianapolis, Presentation Number, 1265.

  19. ALTITUDE TRAINING IS NOT BENEFICIAL FOR SEA LEVEL PERFORMANCE AND ALSO INVOLVES CONSIDERABLE RISKS

    Bailey, D. M., & Davies, B. (1997). Physiological implications of altitude training for endurance performance at sea level: A review. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 31(3), 183-190.

    LIVE HIGH (Hypobaric Hypoxia) - TRAIN LOW (Normobaric Normoxia)

  20. ALTITUDE TENTS HAVE LITTLE VALUE FOR CYCLING PERFORMANCE

    Martin, D. T., Kinsman, T., Eastwood, A., Platt, M., Paton, C., & Hahn, A. G. (2005). Altitude tents do not impair performance response to short-term high-intensity cycling training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 1548.

  21. HYPOXIC SLEEPING IS RELATED TO IMPROVED RUNNING ECONOMY

    Neya, M., Maegawa, T., Kumai, Y., Enoki, T., & Kawahara, T. (2006). The effects of nightly normobaric hypoxia on running economy and hemoglobin mass. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2728.

  22. SHORT-TERM BRIEF EXPOSURES TO SIMULATE HYPOXIA HAVE LITTLE EFFECT

    Katayama, K., Sato, K., Hotta, N., Ishida, K., Iwasaki, K.-I., Miyamura, M. (2006). Effect of intermittent hypoxia on exercise ventilation at a simulated moderate altitude. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 2730.

  23. HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA DOES NOT IMPROVE SUBMAXIMAL PERFORMANCE IN TRAINED ATHLETES

    Truijens, M. J., Rodriguez, F., Townsend, N. E., Stray-Gundersen, J., Gore, C., & Levine, B. D. (2008). The effect of intermittent hypobaric hypoxic exposure and sea level training on submaximal economy in well-trained swimmers and runners. Journal of Applied Physiology, 104, 328-338.

  24. NORMOBARIC EXPOSURE DOES NOT ALTER HYPOBARIC AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Muza, S., Fulco, C., Beidleman, B., Jones, J., Staab, J., Elliott, S., Lammi, E., & Cymeerman, A. (2009). Lowlander time-trial performance at 4300 m is not improved following normobaric intermittent hypoxic exposure conditioning. ACSM 55th Annual Meeting Indianapolis, Presentation Number, 1263.

  25. HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA STIMULATES PULMONARY VENTILATION (VEmax)

    Ogawa, T., Fujii, N., Kurimoto, Y., Honda, Y., & Nishiyasu, T. (2008). The effect of hypobaria on ventilation and VO2max during maximal running. ACSM 55th Annual Meeting Indianapolis, Presentation Number, 1268.

    GENERAL

  26. LOW OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS STIMULATE MORE ANAEROBIC ENERGY

    Ogura, Y., Katamoto, S., Uchimaru, J., Naito, H., & Aoki, J. (2005). Effects of different levels of hypoxia on anaerobic energy release during supramaximal exercise in trained athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 1552.

  27. ALTITUDE SIMULATION DOES NOT STIMULATE EXTRA ERYTHROPOIETIN

    Ashenden, M. J., Hahn, A. G., Martin, D. T., Logan, P., Parisotto, R., & Gore, C. J.(2001). A comparison of the physiological response to simulated altitude exposure and r-HuEpo administration. Journal of Sports Science, 19, 831-837.

  28. INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA DOES NOT DISRUPT TESTING FOR RECOMBINANT HUMAN ERYTHROPOIETIN

    Abellan, R., Ventura, R., Remacha, A. F., Rodriguez, F. A., Pascual, J. A., & Segura, J. (2007). Intermittent hypoxia exposure in a hypobaric chamber and erythropoietin abuse interpretation. Journal of Sports Science, 25, 1241-1250.

  29. HYPOXIA REDUCES THE POTENTIAL OF MUSCULAR ENDURANCE WORK

    Matsura, C., Gomes, P. S., Hayknowsky, M., & Bhambhani, Y. (2007). Cardiorespiratory responses to resistance exercise under hypoxia in healthy subjects. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 921.

  30. MODERATE ALTITUDE ACCLIMATIZATION INCREASES PROTEIN EXCRETION FOLLOWING SPRINT-TYPE EXERCISES

    Luetkemeier, M. J., LaPorte, J. A., & Davis, J. E. (2007). Proteinuria after sprint and endurance-type exercise at moderate altitude. ACSM Annual Meeting New Orleans, Presentation Number, 924.

  31. HEMOGLOBIN INCREASES DO NOT IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OR VO2max

    Calbet, J. A., Radegran, G., Boushel, R., Sondergaard, H., Saltin, B., & Wagner, P. D., (2002). Effect of blood haemoglobin concentration on VO2max and cardiovascular function in lowlanders acclimatized to 5260 m. Journal of Physiology, 545(Part 2), 715-728.

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