Volume 8(4): February, 2002

ALTITUDE TRAINING 3

This fourth issue of Volume 8 of Coaching Science Abstracts is the third issue that reviews articles concerned with altitude training. It adds to the abstracts presented in Volume 2(4) and Volume 5(4). Many of the research problems noted in those issues persist to this day.

red line

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ALTITUDE ADAPTATION

  1. WHY ALTITUDE TRAINING DOES NOT WORK

    Noakes, T. D. (2000). Physiological models to understand exercise fatigue and the adaptations that predict or enhance athletic performance. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 10, 123-145.

  2. ANAEROBIC ENERGY HARDLY COMPROMISED AT ALTITUDE

    Ogita, F., & Tabata, I. (2000). Aerobic and anaerobic energy release during supramaximal swimming at different levels of hypobaric hypoxia. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 1699.

  3. HIGH ALTITUDES ARE NEEDED TO STIMULATE FULL EPO RESPONSE

    Hinojosa, J. R., Sivieri, M. V., Harber, M. P., Karlsen, T., Ge, R. L., Fong, W., Stray-Gundersen, J., & Levine, B. (2000). Dose-response relationship between altitude and erythropoietin. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 57.

  4. THE GENDERS RESPOND DIFFERENTLY TO HYPOXIA

    Sandoval, D. A., & Matt, K. S. (2000). Hypoxia and gender alters metabolic and hormonal response to exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 1223.

  5. ALTITUDE AFFECTS MOOD ONLY IN THE ACCLIMATIZATION PERIOD

    Kambis, K. W., McQuaid, D. B., MacDonald, J. R., Griffin, E., Muza, S. R., Rock, P. B., Cymerman, A., Friedlander, A., & Fulco, C. S. (2001). Interaction of high altitude and caloric deficit on mood state. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1641.

    ALTITUDE AND PERFORMANCE

  6. ALTITUDE SLOWS MARATHONERS

    Roi, G. S., Giacometti, M., & Von Duvillard, S. P. (1999). Marathons in altitude. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 31, 723-758.

  7. MODERATE ALTITUDE TRAINING IS SIMILAR IN EFFECT TO SEA LEVEL TRAINING WHEN TRAINING CONTENT AND INTENSITIES ARE CONTROLLED

    Niess, A. M., Fehrenbach, E., Buergler, J., Fuss, S., Lehmann, R., Roecker, K., Baumann, I., Passek, F., & Dickhuth, H.-H. (2001). Metabolic and hormonal response to interval training at sea level and moderate altitude. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1640.

    LIVE HIGH (Hypobaric Hypoxia) - TRAIN LOW (Normobaric Normoxia)

  8. HILO LIVING DOES NOT CHANGE VO2max BUT DOES INCREASE ANAEROBIC CAPACITY

    Roberts, A. D., Martin, D. T., Gore, C. J., Hahn, A. G., Lee, H., Gawthorn, K. M., Dixon, J., Clark, S., & Slater, G. (2000). Live high:train low altitude exposure enhances anaerobic energy capacity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 56.

  9. LIVE HIGH--TRAIN LOW AFFECTS ENDURANCE FACTORS IN MOST ATHLETES

    Hiller, W. D., Fortess, E. E., Wong, D. L., O'Toole, M. L., Dierenfield, L. M., Titchenal, C. A., Thrower-Rodriguez, T. R., Nielsen, G., R., & Seligman, J. R. (2000). Elite triathletes' results from a "live high, train low" regimen. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 1220.

  10. SOME ATHLETES DO NOT RESPOND TO A LIVE-HIGH/TRAIN-LOW EXPERIENCE

    Hiller, W. D., Kierenfield, L. M., Fortress, E. E., Nielsen, G. R., Pinkert, T. P., Scudder, D. A., Wong, D. L., Thrower-Rodriguez, T. R., Yamada, D. S., Forde, K. J., & Jensen, S. (2001). Response to live high, train low among elite Olympic distance triathletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 10.

  11. HILO TRAINING SUPPOSEDLY IMPROVES CYCLISTS' PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS

    Roberts, A. D., Clark, S., Townsend, N. Anderson, M., & Gore, C. J. (2001). Changes in performance and MAOD after 5, 10, or 15 days of Live high:Train low altitude exposure. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1634.

    LIVE CONTRIVED (Normobaric Hypoxia) - TRAIN LOW (Normobaric Normoxia)

  12. SIMULATED ALTITUDE TRAINING IMPROVES BOTH AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC CYCLING PERFORMANCES

    Meeuwsen, T., Hendriksen, I. J., & Holewijn, M. (1999). Sea-level performance is enhanced by acute intermittent hypobaric hypoxia. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 31(5), Supplement abstract 787.

  13. SHORT EXPOSURES TO NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA PROMOTE INCREASED EPO

    Frey, W. O., Zenhausen, R., Colombani, P. C., & Fehr, J. (2000). Influence of intermittent exposure to normobaric hypoxia on hematological indexes and exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 165.

  14. EPO RESPONSE TO NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA OCCURS QUICKLY

    Stray-Gundersen, J., Karlsen, T., Resaland, G. K., Aasen, S., Lind, C., Birkelan, K., & Hallen, J. (2000). No difference in 3-day EPO response to 8, 12, or 16 hours/day intermittent hypoxia. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 1221.

  15. NORMOBARIC HYPOXIA INDUCES ANAEROBIC CHANGES MORE THAN AEROBIC CHANGES

    Meeuwsen, T., Hendrickson, I. J., & Holewijn, M. (2000). Training-induced increases in sea-level performance is enhanced by acute intermittent hypobaric hypoxia: A 2-year cross-over study. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 1222.

  16. HYPOXIC TENT LIVING IMPROVES RUNNERS' PERFORMANCES

    Ingham, E.A., Pfitzinger, P. D., Hellemans, J., Bailey, C., Fleming, J. S., & Hopkins, W. G. (2001). Running performance following intermittent altitude exposure simulated with nitrogen tents. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 11.

  17. STRENGTH ENDURANCE TRAINING IS NOT IMPROVED IN NORMOBARIC HYPOXIC CONDITIONS

    Friedman, B., Borisch, S., Kucera, K., Muller, H., Erb, G., Richter, G, & Baatsch, P. (2001). Strength endurance training in normobaric hypoxia is not superior to equivalent training in normoxia. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement 559.

  18. ANOTHER "TWEAK" IN THE LIVE HIGH CONDITIONS OF THE HILO TRAINING PROTOCOL

    Witkowski, S., Karlsen, T., Resaland, G., Sivieri, M., Yates, R., Harber, M., Ge, R. L., Stray-Gundersen, J., & Levine, B. D. (2001). Optimal altitude for "Living high-Training low". Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1642.

    GENERAL

  19. RETICULOCYTE PARAMETERS LOCATE EPO ABUSE

    Gore, C. J., Parisotto, R., Hahn, A. G., Ashenden, M. J., Martin, D. T., Pyne, D. B., Gawthorn, K., & Bruguara, C. (2000). Reticulocyte parameters as discriminators of R-HuEPO abuse in elite athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 809.

  20. ARE NITROGEN TENTS ALL THAT EFFECTIVE?

    Rushall Thoughts, [personal letter to Forbes Carlile, December 2, 2001.]

  21. ON US SWIMMING'S ALTITUDE TRAINING, LIVE-HIGH--TRAIN-LOW, AND NITROGEN TENTS

    Rushall Thoughts, April 2002.

  22. EPO RESPONSES TO ALTITUDE CAN BE PREDICTED FROM ENVIRONMENTAL CHAMBER RESPONSIVENESS

    Karlsen, T., Resaland, G. K., Ri-Li, G., Sivieri, M., Witowski, S., Yates, R., Levine, B. D., & Stray-Gundersen, J. (2001). EPO response to 24 hrs of artificial hypobaric hypoxia predicts EPO response to natural altitude. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 556.

Return to Coaching Science Abstracts' Main Table of Contents.

red line