Volume 18(3): November, 2012

RECOVERY 3

This third issue of Volume 18 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with recovery. This topic has been covered in previous issues. They were:

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. GENERAL

  1. RECOVERY STRATEGIES DO NOT AFFECT SUBSEQUENT PERFORMANCES DIFFERENTLY

    Fitzpatrick, P. A., Dolan, E., May, G. C., & Warrington, G. (2009). The effects of various recovery strategies on post-exercise recovery and subsequent performance. ACSM 56th Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington. Presentation Number 737.

  2. TRAINING DOES NOT INFLUENCE LACTATE REMOVAL RATES

    Oosthuyse, T., & Carter, R. N. (1999). Lactate decline during passive recovery from high intensity exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 31, 670-674.

  3. NON-SPECIFIC MODE ACTIVE RECOVERY PROMOTES LACTATE REMOVAL

    Denadai, B., Guglielmo, L., & Denadai, M. (2000). Effect of exercise mode on the blood lactate removal during recovery of high-intensity exercise. Biology of Sport, 17, 37-45.

  4. BLOOD LACTATE REMOVAL IS SIMILAR ACROSS AGE-GROUPS

    Reaburn, P., & Mackinnon, L. (1990). Blood lactate responses in older swimmers during active and passive recovery following maximal sprint swimming. European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, 61, 246-250.

  5. FEMALE PERFORMANCE DECREMENT IS LESS THAN MALES IN REPEATED EXERCISES

    Laurent, C. M., Green, J. M., Bishop, P. A., Sjokvist, J., Richardson, M. T., Schumacker, R. E., & Curtner-smith, M. (June 2. 2010). Effect of Gender on fatigue and recovery following maximal intensity sprint performance. Presentation 1511 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  6. MANUAL MASSAGE AFTER EXERCISE LESSENS PERFORMANCE DECREMENT

    Jakeman, J., Day, J., Byrne, C., & Eston, R. (2009). Effects of a single manual massage treatment on the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage in young active women. A paper presented at the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway, June 24-27.

  7. ACTIVE RECOVERY EXTENDS THE ABILITY TO PRODUCE MAXIMAL EFFORTS

    Haegele, M., Zinner, C., Wahl, P., Sperlich, B., & Mester, J. (2009). Active or passive The influence of two different rest protocols on power output, lactate, and pH time-course and peak oxygen uptake during high intensity training . A paper presented at the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway, June 24-27.

  8. ELITE FEMALE BIATHLETES RECOVER QUICKLY FROM HARD TRAINING

    Emanuelsen, E., Sandbakk, O., Welde, B., & Mork, P. J. (2009). Autonomic recovery during high training loads in female world-class biathlon athletes. A paper presented at the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway, June 24-27.

  9. PLAYERS WITH SPEED AND SPEED-ENDURANCE ABILITIES NEED TO TRAIN MORE CAUTIOUSLY AFTER A WEEKLY FOOTBALL GAME

    Gastin, P., Fahrner, B., Meyer, D., Robinson, D., & Cook, J. (2009). Faster players slower to recover after training and competition, with possible adverse effects on football performance. A paper presented at the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway, June 24-27.

  10. STRETCH-SHORTENING CYCLE FATIGUE DECREASES PERFORMANCE BUT INCREASES PERFORMANCE AT THE END OF RECOVERY

    Cheilleachair, N. N., & Harrison, A. (2010). The acute effects of maximal fatigue on the subsequent performance of endurance trained athletes. Presentation 700 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  11. ACL SURGERY DOES NOT GUARANTEE A RETURN TO SPORT PARTICIPATION

    Ardern, C. L., Webster, K. E., Taylor, N. F., & Feller, J. A. (2010). Return to sport rate is less than might be anticipated following ACL reconstruction surgery. Presentation 768 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  12. HEAVY DEMANDING EXERCISE PRODUCES SLOW-TO-RECOVER MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Bessa, A., de Oliveira, V. N., da Silva, R. J., Damasceno-Leite, A., & Expindola, F. S. (2010). Biochemical tools for determining exercise intensity. Presentation 876 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

    2. ACTIVITIES

  13. LARGE-MUSCLE ACTIVE RECOVERY IMPROVES LACTATE CLEARANCE

    Navalta, J. W., Hrncir, S. P. (2007). Core stabilization exercises enhance lactate clearance following high-intensity exercise. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 21, 1305-1309.

  14. LACTATE REMOVAL BUT NOT PERFORMANCE IMPROVED AFTER ACTIVE RECOVERY

    Franchini, E., Takito, M. Y., Nakamura, F. Y., Matsushigue, K. A., & Peduti Dal'Molin Kiss, M. A. (2003). Effects of recovery type after a judo combat on blood lactate removal and on performance in an intermittent anaerobic task. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 43, 424-431.

  15. LACTATE REMOVAL MOST EFFICIENT AT A WORK RATE SLIGHTLY BELOW THE ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD

    Baldari, C., Videira, M., Madeira, F., Sergio, J., & Guidetti, L. (2005). Blood lactate removal during recovery at various intensities below the individual anaerobic threshold in triathletes. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 45, 460-466 .

  16. MASSAGE AND ACTIVE RECOVERY ARE EFFECTIVE IN LACTATE REMOVAL

    Micklewright, D., Sellens, M., Gladwell, V., & Beneke, R. (2006). Blood lactate removal using combined massage and active recovery. Biology of Sport, 23, 315-325.

  17. CONTRAST TEMPERATURE WATER THERAPY EFFECTIVELY REMOVES BLOOD LACTATE ACCUMULATION IN NETBALL PLAYERS

    Hamlin, M. J. (2007). The effect of recovery modality on blood lactate removal and subsequent repetitive sprint performance in netball players. New Zealand Journal of Sports Medicine, 34, 12-17.

  18. LACTATE THRESHOLD VELOCITY BEST EFFORT LEVEL FOR POST-SWIM RECOVERY

    Greenwood, J. D., Moses, G. E., Bernardino, F. M., Gaesser, G. A., & Weltman, A. (2008). Intensity of exercise recovery, blood lactate disappearance, and subsequent swimming performance. Journal of Sports Science, 26, 29-34.

  19. PASSIVE RECOVERY IS BETTER BETWEEN REPEATED SPRINT SWIMS

    Toubekis, A. G., Douda, H. T., & Tokmakidis, S. P. (2005). Influence of different rest intervals during active or passive recovery on repeated sprint swimming performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 93, 694-700.

  20. EXERCISE ACTIVITY IN RECOVERY IS BETTER THAN REST FOR MAINTAINING PERFORMANCE POTENTIAL

    Felix, S. D., Manos, T. M., Jarvis, A. T., Jensen, B. E., & Headley, S.A. (1997). Swimming performance following different recovery protocols in female collegiate swimmers. Journal of Swimming Research, 12, 1-6.

  21. ANABOLIC RESPONSES ARE ENHANCED BY LOW-INTENSITY AEROBIC EXERCISE FOLLOWING RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Chou, C-C., Wu, S-S., Chen, T-S., Lin, J-C. (June 2, 2010). Low-intensity of running favors for anabolic response after resistance exercise. Presentation 1491 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  22. STATIC STRETCHING DOES INCREASE INTERMITTENT EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Miyahara, Y., Mieda, K., & Ebashi, H. (2009). Effects of static stretching on prolonged intermittent exercise performance. A paper presented at the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway, June 24-27.

  23. ACTIVE RECOVERY WORKS FOR SWIMMING NO MATTER WHAT THE EXERCISE MODE

    Plusch, T., O'Brien, J., Whitebay, C., Wright, S., Wygand, J., & Otto, R. M. (June 03, 2010). The effect of three different modes of recovery on lactate removal rate following a maximal effort swim in masters level swimmers. Presentation 2388 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  24. CONTRAST ACTIVITIES BENEFIT RECOVERY FROM DOMS

    Kaminski, T. W., Fox, K. E., Swanik, C. B., Edwards, D. G., & Gutierrez, G. M. (2010). Monitoring lower leg blood flow during sequential contrast therapy treatments using a simulated injury model. Presentation 765 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  25. LIMB ELEVATION IN RECOVERY HAS BENEFICIAL PROPERTIES

    Pinthong, M., & Tikamram, J. (2011). Influence of recovery postures on thermoregulatory responses following high-intensity intermittent exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 761.

  26. COLD-WATER IMMERSION THERAPY IN RECOVERY APPEARS MOST EFFECTIVE WITH METABOLIC FATIGUE

    Leeder, J., van Someren, K., Gisane, C., Gregson, W., & Howatsons, G. (2011). The effect of cold water immersion on recovery from exercise-induced fatigue: A meta-analysis. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 3036.

  27. POST-RESISTANCE-EXERCISE CARBOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION DOES NOT AFFECT SORENESS IN FEMALES

    Campbell, J. A., Richardson, M. T., Wingo, J. E., Neggers, Y. H., Lawrence, J. C., Leeper, J. D., & Bishop, P. A. (2011). The effect of acute carbohydrate-protein supplementation following exhaustive resistance exercise in trained females. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2219.

    3. SUPPLEMENTS, MEDICATIONS, AND DEVICES

  28. REPEATED WINGATE TESTS ARE NOT AFFECTED BY SODIUM BICARBONATE INGESTION OR RECOVERY MODE

    Siegler, J. C., McNaughton, L. R., Hillman, A., & Keatley, S. (2009). Influence of sodium bicarbonate and an active or passive recovery on repeated Wingate performance. ACSM 56th Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington. Presentation Number 1128.

  29. COMPRESSION GARMENTS WORN DURING RECOVERY DO NOT AFFECT SUBSEQUENT PERFORMANCE

    Terry, P., Parcell, A., & Creer, A. (2011). Effectiveness of wearing compression tights during short recovery periods on subsequent cycling performance. Presentation 619 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  30. GRADUATED COMPRESSION SOCKS WORN IN RACES AND RECOVERY ARE BENEFICIAL FOR RECOVERY

    Welman, K. E., & Terblanche, E. (2010). The effectiveness of compression socks to minimize skeletal muscle damage during and after an ultra-marathon. Presentation 764 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  31. COMPRESSION SOCKS HAVE NO RECOVERY BENEFIT FOR DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Moody, D., Houle, S., Adamson, K., & Creer, A. (2011). The effect of compression socks on recovery and running performance in collegiate distance runners. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2767.

  32. WHEY PROTEIN AND AMINO ACID SUPPLEMENTS FOLLOWING RESISTANCE EXERCISE ARE NO MORE EFFECTIVE FOR RECOVERY THAN A PLACEBO

    Smith, D., Thompson, B. J., Ryan, E. D., Sobolewski, E. J., Everett, L., Fiddler, R. E., & Klufa, J. L. (2011). The effect of muscle recovery drinks on peak torque following an eccentric exercise bout. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(5). Supplement abstract 2220.

  33. CHOCOLATE MILK IS A GOOD POST-PERFORMANCE BEVERAGE

    Lunn, W. R., Pasiakos, S. M., Colletto, M. R., Karfonta, K. E., Carbone, J. W., Anderson, J. M., & Rodriguez, N. R. (2012). Chocolate milk and endurance exercise recovery: protein balance, glycogen, and performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44, 682-691.

  34. ADEQUATE CARBOHYDRATE IS ALL THAT IS NEEDED FOR RECOVERY

    Beelen, M., Van Kranenburg, J., Senden, J. M., Kuipers, H., & Van Loon, L. J. (2012). Impact of caffeine and protein on post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44, 692-700.

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