Volume 12(3): November, 2006

RECOVERY

This third issue of Volume 12 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with recovery. This topic has been covered in two previous issues. They were:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. GENERAL

  1. RECOVERY HEART RATE RESPONSES DIFFER BETWEEN FORMS OF ENDURANCE EXERCISE

    Uusitalo, A. L., Hoffman, T. A., Tummavuori, E. A., & Rusko, H. K. (1998). Heart rate recovery after typical endurance exercise session in athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 607.

  2. HEART RATE FUNCTION RECOVERS SLOWLY AFTER EXHAUSTING COMPETITIONS AND IS PARTICULARLY INDIVIDUAL

    Hautala, A. J., Tulppo, M. P., Makikallio, T. H., Laukkanen, R., Nissila, S., & Huikuri, H. V. (2000). Heart rate dynamics before and after long-term maximal exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 720.

  3. RECOVERY HEART RATE IS NOT RELATED TO CHILDREN'S AEROBIC FITNESS

    Anderson, C. S., Mahon, A. D., & Brooker, M. J. (2001). Heart rate recovery in children following aerobic exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1759.

  4. RUNNING KINEMATICS ARE CONSISTENT DESPITE DIFFERENT RECOVERY PERIODS IN INTERVAL TRAINING

    Collins, M. H., Pearsall, D. J., Zavorsky, G. S., Bateni, H., Turcotte, R. A., & Montgomery, D. L. (2000). Acute effects of intense interval training on running mechanics. Journal of Sports Science, 18, 83-90.

  5. ECCENTRIC STRENGTH-TRAINING MUSCLE DAMAGE LASTS FOR 48 HOURS

    Dolezal, B A., Potteiger, J. A., Jacobsen, D. J., & Benedict, S. H. (2000). Muscle damage and resting metabolic rate after acute resistance exercise with an eccentric overload. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32, 1202-1207.

  6. FATIGUED FORCE PRODUCTION DOES NOT RECOVER FULLY IN ONE HOUR

    Allman, B. L., & Rice, C. L. (2000). Intermittent high intensity fatigue and one-hour recovery in elbow flexors. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 829.

  7. STRENGTH TRAINING EFFECTS ARE LOST AFTER SIX MONTHS OF DETRAINING

    Silva, E. B., Teixeira, M. S., Pinto, F. G., Santos, C. B., Filho, M. V., & Gomes, P. S. (2001). Effects of training frequencies on detraining after upper body muscular strength training in military males 18 years of age. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 752.

  8. 15 DAYS OF DETRAINING DOES NOT ALTER PHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES

    Flaherty, J. M (2003). Changes in anaerobic power and selected cardiovascular variables associated with fifteen days of training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 1876.

  9. DOPAMINE COULD BE AN EXERCISE STRESS INDICATOR

    Shannon, M. P., Smith, B., & Meeusen, R. (2004). Catecholamine responses to competition taper of elite athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1019.

  10. STRENGTH TRAINING REDUCES STRENGTH PERFORMANCES RAPIDLY

    Chen, T. C. (1998). The effects of repeated maximal isokinetic eccentric exercise on total work and isometric force. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 622.

    2. ACTIVITIES

  11. FASTEST RECOVERY AFTER RESISTANCE TRAINING OCCURS WITH A VERY LIGHT LOAD AEROBIC EXERCISE

    Corder, K., Potteiger, J., Nau, K., Figoni, S., & Hershberger, S. (1998). Effects of active and passive recovery on lactate, RPE, and performance during resistance training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 194.

  12. ACTIVE RECOVERY HAS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS ON SUBSEQUENT MAXIMUM ANAEROBIC WORK

    Spierer, D. K., Baran, D. A., Goldsmith, R. L., & Katz, S. D. (2001). Active recovery between high-intensity exercise bouts improves performance in hockey players. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 780.

  13. ACTIVE RECOVERY IS PHYSIOLOGICALLY BENEFICIAL FOR SOFTBALL PITCHERS

    Skelton, M. S., & Kesslar, R. (2001). Effect of an active recovery between innings on heart rate, blood pressure, arm girth and blood lactate levels in college softball pitchers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 885.

  14. ACTIVE RECOVERY REDUCES ACCUMULATED LACTATE BUT DOES NOT AFFECT SUBSEQUENT EXERCISE

    Febbraio, M. A., McAich, A. J., Parkin, J. M., Zhao, S., & Carey, M. F. (1999). Effect of mode of recovery on metabolism and performance during subsequent exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 31(5), Supplement abstract 824.

  15. ACTIVE RECOVERY ACCELERATES LACTATE REMOVAL IN FEMALES

    Coffer, L. W., McCarthy, J. P., Miller, C. T., Neason, M. V., & Wyatt, F. B. (2003). The effects of active and passive recovery on blood lactate. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 2070.

  16. POST-EXERCISE ACTIVITY DOES NOT AFFECT PERCEPTIONS OF EXERCISE

    Kilpatrick, M. W., Bartholomew, J. B., Stromberg, D. H., & Hebert, E. P. (2002). Impact of aerobic cool-down and fitness status on post-exercise perceptions of exercise experience. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 34(5), Supplement abstract 159.

  17. ACTIVE RECOVERY BETTER THAN PASSIVE RECOVERY

    Finke, H. M., Moore, M. J., Glowaki, S. P., & Crouse, S. F (2003). Effects of recovery on lactate and vertical jump after high intensity resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 2243.

  18. ACTIVE RECOVERY INTERFERES WITH HIGH-INTENSITY PERFORMANCE IN CHILDREN

    Baquet, G., Dupont, G., Van Praagh, E., & Berthoin, S. (2006). Effect of active versus passive recovery during high-intensity intermittent exercises in children. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1477.

  19. TWO MINUTES OF ACTIVE RECOVERY IS BEST FOR HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING

    Seiler, S., & Hetlelid, K. J. (2004). Impact of rest duration on physiological and RPE responses during interval training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1021.

  20. COOL DOWN SWIMMING USUALLY IS NOT DONE CORRECTLY

    Strozberg, M. V., & Klar, A. B. (1998). Assisted cool down procedures in high performance swimmers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 281.

  21. SUBMAXIMAL SWIMMING PRODUCES BEST LACTATE REMOVAL IN RECOVERY

    Neric, F. B., Beam, W., & Brown, L. E. (2006). The effects of electrical stimulation and submaximal swimming on blood lactate following a maximal effort 200 yard front crawl. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1405.

  22. AEROBIC TRAINING IMPROVES RECOVERY FROM ANAEROBIC WORK

    Cannon, E. W., Rhodes, E. C., Martin, A. D., & Coutts, K. D. (1998). Aerobic training and recovery VO2 kinetics after supramaximal exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 1130.

  23. BETWEEN BASEBALL GAMES RECOVERY PERIOD DOES NOT AFFECT COMMON RECOVERY MEASURES FOR PITCHERS

    Potteiger, J. A., Blessing, D. L., & Wilson, G. D. (1992). Effects of varying recovery periods on muscle enzymes, soreness, and performance in baseball pitchers. Journal of Athletic Training, 27, 27-31.

  24. HOCKEY SKATING PERFORMANCE NOT INFLUENCED BY RECOVERY ACTIVITIES

    Watson, R. C., & Hanley, R. D. (1986). Application of active recovery techniques for a simulated ice hockey task. Canadian Journal of Applied Sports Sciences, 11, 82-87.

  25. POST-STRENGTH EXERCISE MASSAGE DOES NOT EFFECT DOMS

    Hillbert, J. E., Sforzo, G. A., & Swenssen, T. (2001). The effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 699.

  26. HARD RESISTANCE TRAINING REQUIRES CONSIDERABLE INTER-SESSION RECOVERY

    McLester, J. R., Bishop, P, Smith, J., Dale, B., & Kozusko, J. (2001). Effect of training volume on recovery from resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1819.

  27. BETWEEN INNINGS BREAKS IN PITCHING ARE HARMFUL TO PERFORMANCE

    Nagatomi, R., Tanabe, K., Sakurai, M., Nakajima, Y., Fujimoto, T., Nagamatsu, T., & Hamada, K. (2005). Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids counteracts the reduction in throwing speed of baseball pitchers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 1838.

  28. ICING BETWEEN INNINGS IMPROVES PITCHING CHARACTERISTICS

    Verducci, F. M. (2001). Interval cryotherapy and fatigue in university baseball pitchers. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 72, 280-287.

  29. ICE/WATER IMMERSION IN RECOVERY HELPS ONLY SOME ATHLETES

    Bosak, A., Bishop, P., Smith, J., Green, M., Richardson, M., & Iosia, M. (2006). Impact of cold water immersion on 5 Km racing performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5),Supplement abstract 1567.

  30. MASSAGE DOES NOT HASTEN RECOVERY AFTER A HALF-MARATHON

    Tidus, P. M., Dawson, K. A., Dawson, L., Roefs, A., & Bombardier, E. (2004). Massage does not influence muscle soreness or strength recovery following a half-marathon. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 131.

  31. FULL-BODY MASSAGE INCREASES METABOLISM

    Pocklington, A. J., & Repovich, W. E. (2002). The effects of massage on metabolism. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 34(5), Supplement abstract 398.

  32. MASSAGE COMBINED WITH ACTIVE RECOVERY IS BEST FOR HIGH-INTENSITY EFFORTS

    Monedero, J., & Donne, B. (2000). Effect of recovery interventions on lactate removal and subsequent performance. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 21, 593-597.

  33. MASSAGE GIVES NO ADDED BENEFIT TO ACTIVE RECOVERY

    Micklewright, D. P., Beneke, R., Gladwell, V., & Sellens, M. H. (2003). Blood lactate removal using combined massage and active recovery. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 1755.

  34. POST-EXERCISE MASSAGE REDUCES DOMS AND IMPROVES PERFORMANCE IN FEMALE ATHLETES

    Mancilelli, C. A., Brady, M., Hendershot, A., Smith, C., & Stuchell, A. (2004). Effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness and physical performance in female collegiate athletes. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 1144.

  35. ALUMINUM WEAVE CAPE LOWERS CORE TEMPERATURE FASTER IN RECOVERY

    Smith, J. W., Kovacs, M. S., Strecker, E., & Pascoe, D. D. (2004). Efficacy of aluminum weave cooling capes in reducing thermal load following exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 2134.

    3. SUPPLEMENTS AND MEDICATIONS

  36. IBUPROFEN DOES NOT ATTENUATE POST-EXERCISE MUSCLE SORENESS

    Osei, A. K., Kolkhorst, F. W., Dolgener, F. A., & Hensley, L. D. (1998). Effects of Ibuprofen on delayed-onset muscle soreness and subsequent exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 580.

  37. NEITHER IBUPROFEN NOR BROMELAIN HELPS AFTER FATIGUING EXERCISE

    Stone, M. B., Merrick, M. A., Ingersoll, C. D. & Edwards, J. E. (2001). Ibuprofen and bromelain do not resolve pain or muscle soreness. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 696.

  38. CHONDROITIN SULFATE DOES NOT REDUCE POST-EXERCISE MUSCLE PAIN

    Flynn, M. G., Braun, W. A., Armstrong, J., Lambert, C. P., Jacks, D., Yates, J., & Mylona, E. (1998). Effect of oral chondroitin sulfate supplements on muscle soreness, creatine kinase, and markers of inflammation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 30(5), Supplement abstract 581.

  39. R4 BETTER THAN GATORADE FOR RECOVERY AFTER GLYCOGEN-DEPLETION

    Williams, M. B., Raven, P. B., & Ivy, J. L. (1999). Effects of recovery drinks after prolonged glycogen-depleted exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 31(5), Supplement abstract 486.

  40. ASCORBIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION REDUCES MUSCLE DAMAGE

    Bailey, D. M., Williams, C., Hurst, T., & Powell, J. (2001). Recovery from downhill running following ascorbic acid supplementation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 695.

  41. L-CARNITINE ENHANCES RECOVERY AFTER RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Sharp, C. P., Rubin, M. R., Volek, J. S., Gomez, A. L., Wickham, R. B., Ratamess, N. A., Doan, B. K., French, D. N., Mazzetti, S. A., McGuigan, M., Jemiolo, B. Craig, B. W., Pearson, D. R., Newton, R. U., Kitaura, T., Dooly, C. R., & Kraemer, W. J. (2001). The influence of L-carnitine on muscle damage, soreness, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) after resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 698.

  42. VITAMIN C NOT HELPFUL AFTER SEVERE EXERCISE

    Thompson, D., Williams, C., McGregor, S. J., Jones, S., Rengree, A., McArdle, F., & Jackson, M. J. (2001). Recovery from prolonged intermittent shuttle-running following post-exercise vitamin C supplementation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 940.

  43. HARD WORK REQUIRES MORE ENERGY FOR RECOVERY

    Dooly, C. R., Diotti, K. A., & Dotson, C. O. (2002). Recovery metabolism following exercise above and below the anaerobic threshold. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 34(5), Supplement abstract 1213.

  44. AFTER GAME CARBOHYDRATE LOADING ASSISTS RECOVERY

    Orbetelli, R., Valquer, W. Capelli, C., & Barros, T. L. (2003). Carbohydrate loading in soccer players after the game affects mood, muscle, and physical performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 1180.

  45. LOW GLYCEMIC INDEX CHO RECOVERY MEAL AFFECTS ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE

    Stevenson, E. J., Williams, C., McComb, G., & Oram, C. (2004). Improved recovery from prolonged exercise following the consumption of low glycemic index carbohydrate meals. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 157.

  46. CARBOHYDRATE-PROTEIN SUPPLEMENT ACCELERATES GLYCOGEN RESYNTHESIS IN RECOVERY

    Berardi, J. M., Price T. B., Noreen, E. E., & Lemon, W. R. (2004). Post-exercise muscle glycogen recovery is enhanced with a carbohydrate-protein supplement. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 286.

  47. CARBOHYDRATE-PROTEIN RECOVERY DRINK DOES NOT IMPROVE SUBSEQUENT PERFORMANCE

    Millard-Stafford, M., Moore, L., Fritz, D., Snow, T., & Hitchcock, K. (2004). Recovery from exhaustive running: Efficacy of a carbohydrate-protein beverage. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 290.

  48. CARBOHYDRATE/PROTEIN BEVERAGE PROMOTES BETTER RECOVERY

    Romano, B. C., Todd, M. K., & Saunders, M. J. (2004). Effect of a 4:1 ratio carbohydrate/protein beverage on endurance performance, muscle damage, and recovery. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 851.

  49. CARBOHYDRATE PLUS PROTEIN IS EQUALLY EFFECTIVE AS CARBOHYDRATE FOR RESTORING ENDURANCE CAPACITY

    Betts, J. A., Duffy, K., Gunner, F., & Williams, C. (2005). Recovery of endurance running capacity following ingestion of carbohydrate plus protein. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 2187.

  50. CARBOHYDRATE+PROTEIN MIGHT REDUCE SOME MUSCLE SORENESS

    Luden, N. D., Saunders, M. J., Pratt, C. A., Bickford, A. S., Todd, K., & Flohr, J. A. (2006). Effects of a six-day carbohydrate/protein intervention on muscle damage, soreness, and performance in runners. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5),Supplement abstract 1995.

  51. CARBOHYDRATE+PROTEIN DOES NOT INFLUENCE MUSCLE SORENESS AND LOSS OF STRENGTH AFTER RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    White, J., Austrin, K., Breer, B., St. John, N., & Patton, L. (2006). Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplement timing on exercise-induced muscle damage. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1997.

  52. CHOCOLATE MILK IS AN EFFECTIVE RECOVERY BEVERAGE

    Karp, J. R., Johnston, J. D., Tecklenburg, S., Mickleborough, T., Fly, A., & Stager, J. M. (2004). The efficacy of chocolate milk as a recovery aid. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 850.

  53. L-GLUTAMINE SUPPLEMENTATION IMPROVES RECOVERY

    Piattolly, T., & Welsch, M. A. (2004). L-glutamine supplementation: Effects on recovery from exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 853.

  54. POST-MARATHON SUPPLEMENTATION ENHANCES RECOVERY

    Talbott, S. M. (2004). Post-marathon recovery enhanced by a dietary supplement. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 854.

  55. RECOVERY PROCEDURES DO NOT AFFECT SWIMMERS' RECOVERY

    Al Nawaiseh, A. M., Bishop, P., Pritchett, R. C., Porter, S., & McIlquham. (2005). Short-term recovery Impact of antioxidant vitamins, protein supplement, Ibuprofen, and ice. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37(5), Supplement abstract 239.

  56. CAFFEINE AIDS IN REDUCING DELAYED MUSCLE SORENESS AFTER ECCENTRIC EXERCISE

    Maridakis, V., O'Connor, P. J., Dudley, G. A., & McCully, K. (2006). Caffeine attenuates delayed onset muscle pain following eccentric exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1332.

  57. BCAA SUPPLEMENTATION REDUCES MUSCLE SORENESS AND FATIGUE

    Koba, T., Hamada, K., Sakurai, M., Matsumoto, K., Higuchi, T., Zhao, M., & Miyata, H. (2006). BCAA supplement attenuates muscle soreness and serum tissue damage markers during an intensive training program. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5), Supplement abstract 1988.

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