Volume 19(4): February, 2014

OVERLOAD AND OVERTRAINING 7

This fourth issue of Volume 16 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with overload and overtraining. Six previous issues, namely Volume 1(3), Volume 4(3), Volume 7(4), Volume 10(4), Volume 13(4), and Volume 16(4) also dealt with this topic. The information from those six sources, as well as that contained in this issue, will yield an extensive knowledge base of recent research in the application of the overload principle and overtraining, which results from extended and excessive overload training.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

    OVERLOAD FEATURES

  1. OVERTRAINING IS EVIDENCED BY EARLIER OVERUSE OF AEROBIC RESOURCES

    Bishop, D., De Vrijer, A., & Russell, S. (2009). Earlier task failure following overtraining is not associated with the earlier accumulation of maximal levels of blood lactate. A paper presented at the 14th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway, June 24-27.

  2. NO MARKERS INDICATE EXCESSIVE TRAINING IN ROWERS

    Smith, T. B., Hopkins, W. G., & Lowe, T. E. (2010). Are there useful physiological or psychological markers for monitoring overload training in elite athletes? Presentation 873 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  3. SMALL INCREASES IN LOAD IMPACT UPON PERFORMANCE COSTS

    Drum, S. M., & Busing, J. K. (2010). Running with various loads causes change in subjective and objective physiological variables. Presentation 875 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

  4. SUDDEN INCREASES IN TRAINING VOLUME PRODUCE CHANGES IN STRESS MARKERS

    Rama, L., Alves, F., & Teixeira, A. M. (2010). Hormonal, immune, autonomic and mood states variation at the initial preparation phase of a winter season, in Portuguese male swimmers. A paper presented at the XIth International Symposium for Biomechanics and Medicine in Swimming, Oslo, June 1619, 2010.

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