MALE BASKETBALL PLAYERS ARE STRONGER THAN FEMALE BASKETBALL PLAYERS

Fry, A. C., Hudy, A., Gallagher, P. M., Vardiman, J. P., Kudrna, R. A., Moodie, N. G., McCartney, M. K., & Bustamante, J. J. (2010). Lower body power-load curves for NCAA Division I menís and womenís collegiate basketball players. Presentation 797 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

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This study determined the barbell loads that elicited the greatest external mean power for the speed-squat exercise, and to determine differences between men (N = 12) and women (N = 14) basketball players at a NCAA Division I university. Maximum parallel barbell strength (1 RM) and speed-squats at seven relative percentage loads of 1 RM were performed. An external dynamometer was used to determine mean external power at each load.

Absolute and relative squat strength was greater for men than for women. Maximal mean external speed-squat power and maximal mean external speed-squat power relative to body weight were greater for men than for women. Men and women were similar for % 1 RM at which maximal mean external speed-squat power occurred. Absolute and relative strength and power measures were highly correlated, but regression slopes were different for men and women.

Implication. Male basketball players were stronger and more powerful than female players for both absolute and relative strength and power measures in a speed-squat exercise, although the % 1 RM loads for maximal mean external speed-squat power were similar. Gender differences require gender-specific treatments in auxiliary resistance training.

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