Volume 10(5): March, 2005

MEASURING PRACTICE EFFORT 4.1

This fifth issue of Volume 10 of Coaching Science Abstracts reviews articles concerned with using ratings of perceived exertion and heart rates to measure practice effort. Three previous issues, namely Volume 1(5), Volume 4(5), and Volume 7(5), also dealt with this topic. The information from those three sources, as well as that contained in this issue, will yield an extensive knowledge base of recent research in these two indices of exercise response.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    RATING OF PERCEIVED EXERTION GENERAL

  1. VISUAL ANALOG SCALES COULD IMPROVE ON THE BORG SCALE AT MODERATE EXERCISE INTENSITIES

    Ueda, T., Nabetani, T., & Teramoto, K. (2003). An evaluation of visual analog scales for the measurement of perceived exertion during exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 314.

  2. RPE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH PREDICTING AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Garcin, M., Mille-Hamard, L., & Billat, V. (2004). Influence of aerobic fitness level on measured and estimated perceived exertion during exhausting runs. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 25, 270-277.

  3. PERCEIVED EXERTIONS OF STRENGTH MOVEMENTS ARE UNDERESTIMATED

    Bean, M. J., & Stegall, A. B. (2003). Perceived exertion during resistance training in trained and untrained females. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 1619.

  4. RPE PREDICTS SUB-MAXIMAL RESISTANCE LOADS

    Engbreston, B., Fillinger, M., Genson, C., Lynch, M., Redington, M., & Shewchuk, J. (2004). Can the Borg RPE be used to prescribe resistance exercise intensity? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 67.

  5. RPE SELECTION IS RELIABLE

    Gearhart, R. F. (2004). Using ratings of perceived exertion to self-select exercise intensity following different anchoring procedures. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 917.

    RATING OF PERCEIVED EXERTION SPECIFICS

  6. HIGH INTENSITY RESISTANCE EXERCISE WORK RATINGS DIFFER DEPENDING ON HOW REFERENCE LEVELS ARE ESTABLISHED

    Lagally, K. M., & Costigan, E. M. (2003). The effect of anchoring procedures on ratings of perceived exertion during resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 310.

  7. RUNNING SPEED CHANGES ARE RELATED TO RPE CHANGES BUT DIFFER LESS AT HIGHER EFFORT LEVELS

    Martin, S. B., & Jackson, A. W. (2003). Production of running speed using RPE as the stimulus signal. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 311.

  8. VENTILATORY BREAKPOINT MEASURED RELIABLY BY TWO RPE SCALES

    Jekal, Y-S., Aaron, D. J., Robertson, R. J., Nagle, E. F., & Pcsolyar, M. J. (2004). Perceived exertion at ventilatory breakpoint in adult females and males using the OMNI-cycle RPE Scale. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 822.

    RATING OF PERCEIVED EXERTION USES

  9. INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT WORK LEVELS ARE ADEQUATE FOR PRODUCING WORK AT THOSE LEVELS

    Gearhart, R. F., & Becque, M. D. (2003). Ratings of perceived exertion at relative oxygen uptakes following cognitive and physiological anchoring. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 309.

  10. SPORT DRINK EFFECTS ARE SIMILAR FOR BOTH GENDERS

    Wingo, J. E., Cureton, K. J., Millard-Stafford, M. L., & Stueck, M. G. (2003). Effects of sport drink ingestion in male and female cyclists. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 1724.

  11. RESISTANCE TRAINING MAKES ENSUING AEROBIC TRAINING HARDER

    Riebe, D., Morrell, C. a., Ward, C. L., Blissmer, B., Maher, J. F., & Silva, J. E. (2004). The effects of exercise order on the perceptual response to cardiovascular and resistance exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 916.

    RATING OF PERCEIVED EXERTION AND HEART RATE COMPARISON

  12. FASTER RATES OF EXERCISE SEEM EASIER

    Reneau, P., & Lockhart, A. (2004). Impact of cycling rates on heart rate and rate of perceived exertion while performed at the same work rate. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 913.

  13. HIGHER WORK RATES DO NOT SEEM HARDER ALTHOUGH THEY HAVE A HIGHER METABOLIC RATE

    Gairola, A., Randall, C. R., Goss, F. L., & Robertson, R. J. (2004). RPE response to varying cycle ergometer pedal rates using the adult OMNI-Cycle Scale. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 914.

    HEART RATE GENERAL

  14. HEART RATE VARIABILITY THRESHOLD COINCIDES WITH LACTATE THRESHOLD

    Gretebeck, R. J., Sutton, J. L., Karapetian, G. K., & Engels, H. J. (2004). Use of heart rate variability to estimate lactate threshold. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 36(5), Supplement abstract 293.

  15. HEART RATE RESPONSIVENESS IS DIFFERENT BETWEEN SUBMAXIMAL AND HIGH-LEVEL EXERCISE INTENSITIES

    Down, R. J., Krishnan, B., Burgess, J. J., Busse, E. F., & Haennel, R. G. (2001). The relationship between heart rate kinetics and relative exercise intensity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 612.

  16. ABSOLUTE HEART RATES SHOULD NOT BE USED TO PRESCRIBE ACTIVITY FOR ADOLESCENTS

    Ekelund, U., Poortvliet, E., Yngve, A., Nilsson, A., Hurtig-Wennlof, A., & Sjostrom, M. (2001). Heart rate as an indicator of physical activity intensity in adolescents. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1406.

  17. RECOVERY HEART RATE IS NOT RELATED TO CHILDREN'S AEROBIC FITNESS

    Anderson, C. S., Mahon, A. D., & Brooker, M. J. (2001). Heart rate recovery in children following aerobic exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 1759.

  18. AEROBIC TRAINING ALTERS HEART RATE CHARACTERISTICS IN A MINOR WAY

    Pigozzi, F., Alabiso, A., Parisi, A., Di Salvo, V., Di Luigi, L., Spataro, A., & Iellamo, F. (2001). Effects of aerobic exercise training on 24 hr profile of heart rate variability in female athletes. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 41, 101-107.

  19. HEART RATES ARE ACTIVITY/SPORT SPECIFIC

    Roecker, K., Striegel, H., & Dickhuth, H. H. (2003). Heart rate recommendations: Transfer between running and cycling exercise. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 24, 173-178.

  20. HEART RATE NOT GOOD FOR INDICATING PACING

    Davison, R. C., Smith, M. F., Coleman, D. A., Baler, J., & Bird, S. R. (2000). Variability of power output during 40-km outdoor time-trial cycling performances. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 32(5), Supplement abstract 1446.

    HEART RATE SPECIFICS

  21. SLEEPING HEART RATE IS NOT RELATED TO TRAINING LOAD

    Schultz, J., Hartmann, U., Platen, P., Grabow, V., Wostmann, R., Nie, M., Bartmus, U., & Heck, H. (2001). Training load has little influence on sleeping heart rate. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33(5), Supplement abstract 750.

    PAIN

  22. PERFORMING WITH PAIN IS NOT RECOMMENDED

    Diederichsen, L. P., Winther, A. K., Dyhre-Poulsen, P, Krogsgaard, M. R., & Norregaard, J. (2003). Changes in should muscle activity during experimentally induced pain. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 35(5), Supplement abstract 1563.

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