PEAK POWER OUTPUT RECOVERY UNRELATED TO AEROBIC FUNCTIONING

Glaister, M., Pattison, J. R., Dancy, B., & McInnes, G. (2012). The influence of aerobic fitness on the recovery of peak power output. Presentation 1335 at the 59th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, San Francisco, California; May 29-June 2, 2012.

red line

This study evaluated the influence of aerobic fitness on the recovery of peak power output following a maximal 30-second sprint. Well-trained men (N = 16; 21 3 years) performed a 30-second maximal sprint on a cycle ergometer, followed by a predetermined stationary rest period (5, 10, 20, 40, 80, or 160 seconds) and a subsequent 5-second sprint to determine the kinetics of peak power output during recovery. On another occasion, oxygen uptake (VO2 ) was monitored during recovery from a 30-second sprint to enable the comparison of the recovery kinetics of oxygen uptake and peak power output. Ss also completed a maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) test to evaluate the influence of this parameter on the recovery of peak power output.

There were no differences in the variables in the recovery kinetics of peak power output and oxygen uptake. Over time, the variables changed significantly. Post hoc tests detected differences between the two variables only at 20 seconds. Time constants for the kinetics of peak power output and oxygen uptake were poorly correlated and were not significantly different. There were no significant correlations between VO2max and the time constants of either peak power output or oxygen uptake.

Implication. Recovery of peak power output is unrelated to oxygen uptake or maximum oxygen uptake.

Return to Table of Contents for this issue.

red line