WATER IMMERSION DOES NOT MODIFY RECOVERY OR ENSUING PERFORMANCE

Amorim, F. T., De Paula, F., Ottone, V., Aguiar, P., Fiche, P., Aguiar, M., Duarte, T., Araujo, T., Costa, K., Coimbra, C., Magalhaes, F., & Rocha-Viera, R. (2013). Recovery using different water immersion temperatures does not improve performance after an exercise session. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 45(5), Supplement abstract number 2915.

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This study evaluated the effects of recovery using different water-immersion temperatures on performance after exercise in physically active males (N = 9). Ss participated in four randomized experimental sessions conducted in a temperate environment. Prior to experimental sessions to establish baseline, Ss completed a 5-km maximal self-paced treadmill running test (5-km running) and a Wingate test in rested conditions. Each experimental session consisted of unilateral eccentric knee extension exercise (3 x 10 repetitions) and 90 minutes of treadmill running at 70% of VO2peak followed by 15 minutes of passive recovery seated at room temperature or immersed in water at 15C, 28C, or 38C. After four hours, in order to evaluate the recovery, Ss again underwent the 5-km running test followed by the Wingate test. Average speed and relative peak power were measured. Rectal temperature and heart rate were recorded through the entire session

The experimental exercise session reduced the ensuing 5-km running speed but not the Wingate peak power. The 5-km running speed and the Wingate test peak power were not different among the control condition and the 15C, 28C and 38C immersion treatments. Rectal temperature was lower after water immersion at 15C, compared with 28C and 38C but not different to the control condition. Water immersion at 15C induced lower heart compared to the 38C treatment. During the 5-km running and the Wingate test, rectal temperature and heart rate were not different among conditions.

Implication. Water immersion at three different temperatures in recovery did not modify performance after an exercise session.

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