INDIVIDUALS DO NOT NECESSARILY RESPOND IN ALL VARIABLES WHEN EXPOSED TO ENDURANCE TRAINING

Scharhag-Rosenberger, F., Walitzek, S., Kindermann, W., & Meyer, T. (2012). Differences in adaptations to one year of aerobic endurance training: individual patterns of non-response. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 22, 113-118.

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This study analyzed the individual responses of Ss to one year of endurance training. Ss (N = 18; 425 years) completed a one-year jogging/walking program (3 days/week, 45-minute sessions at 60% heart rate reserve). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), resting heart rate, exercise heart rate, and individual anaerobic threshold were determined by treadmill and cycling ergometry respectively. Intra-individual coefficients of variation were extracted from the literature to distinguish random changes from training responses.

Eight Ss showed improvements in all variables. In 10 Ss, one or two variables did not improve (VO2max, resting heart rate, exercise heart rate, and individual anaerobic threshold remained unchanged in four, four, three and one case, respectively). At least one variable improved in each S.

Implication. While theory lists variables that improve with endurance training, in individuals not all the commonly stated variables respond to that form of exercise. It would be dubious practice to assume that common variables improve in all those who participate in pure aerobic exercise.

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