SELF-REGULATION OF EFFORT IN YOUNG FEMALES ONLY NEEDS PRACTICE

Ireland, L. M., Ledezma, C. M., Waechter, J. D., Wisniewski, K. S., Shafer, A. B., Gallagher, M., Goss, F. L., Nagle, E. F., & Robertson, R. J. (2010). Effect of teleoanticipation on intensity self-regulation error during cycle exercise in females. Presentation 669 at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; June 2-5.

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"A teleoanticipation practice trial is hypothesized to reduce exercise intensity self-regulation error. Self-regulation error occurs when a prescribed oxygen consumption (VO2) is not attained. In addition to teleoanticipation, cognitive feedback provides guidance in subjectively adjusting exercise intensity to produce a Target rating of perceived exertion, further reducing self-regulation errors."

This study examined the effect of teleoanticipation with and without cognitive feedback on intensity self-regulation error during cycling exercise in recreationally active females. Ss were randomly assigned to three groups. Group 1 (N = 13) and Group 2 (N = 9) completed four separate exercise trials presented in the following order: 1) estimation, 2) just noticeable difference, 3) calibration (Teleoanticipation), and 4) production. Calibration and production trials were 21 minutes with Ss instructed to regulate intensity to produce a target rating of perceived exertion of 5 on the OMNI 0-10 Scale. During the calibration treatment, cognitive feedback was provided to Group 1 but not to Group 2. Group 3 (control; N = 9) completed the estimation, just noticeable difference, and production trials. The VO2 analog of each Sís perceived exertion just noticeable difference was used to identify self-regulation error, that is, VO2 above or below the just noticeable difference-VO2 range.

Self-regulation error was: a) lower when cognitive feedback was provided than when it was not made available; b) lower for the control than the without cognitive feedback conditions; and c) equal between the with-cognitive-feedback and control conditions. Results were similar between the genders.

Implication. A teleoanticipation calibration trial with cognitive feedback improved the ability to self-regulate effort intensity at a target rating of perceived exertion of 5 during 21 minutes of cycling exercise. The self-regulation error was similar between the with-cognitive-feedback and control conditions. For young females, self-regulation practice may be all that is required to produce a target rating of perceived exertion during cycling exercise.

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